ES Xeon Discussion

Notice: Page may contain affiliate links for which we may earn a small commission through services like Amazon Affiliates or Skimlinks.

RolloZ170

Well-Known Member
Apr 24, 2016
5,276
1,595
113
Guys, tell me, I downloaded this version MC Extractor v1.96.0 r279 on GitHub
but nothing works for me when I drag and drop the BIOS into MCE.py
can't open anything
you need to install python and some required modules.
read MCU.txt
Code:
now Do I Open a Terminal Window in a Folder?
Open the folder you wish to open the command prompt window from.
Type cmd into the location bar at the top of the window and tap enter.
The command prompt will now be opened in the desired location.

Fixed:

Install Python 3.9.0 with

1) Set "PATH"
2) Set "py Launcher"
3) Set "Associate"

Open an admin command prompt in:

C:\Users\****\AppData\Local\Programs\Python\Python39\

where **** is your windows username.

and run:

python -m pip install --upgrade pip


In:

C:\Users\****\AppData\Local\Programs\Python\Python39\Scripts\

admin command prompt and run:

pip3 install colorama PLTable

Then in the same command prompt run:

pip3 install prettytable

Now you have the latest v1.0.2 PLTable and pip and will get no MCE errors in UBU Tool.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: AVID-MEDIA

ironhamster

New Member
Jun 15, 2021
5
2
3
Guys, tell me, I downloaded this version MC Extractor v1.96.0 r279 on GitHub
but nothing works for me when I drag and drop the BIOS into MCE.py
can't open anything
View attachment 35076
As RolloZ170 said, you're probably missing some dependencies. Try running:

$ pip3 install colorama
$ pip3 install pltable

It prompted me to install those. Otherwise, try running it from the terminal and see what it complains about...
 

pisiiki

New Member
Mar 3, 2024
10
0
1
Hello there!

What a fantastic thread. I've been curious about the Sapphire Rapids Engineering Sample (ES) versions and have been searching for information, but I'm still somewhat confused. I spend a significant amount of time compiling code on my machine (UE C++ and shaders, Linux packages, etc.). As you can imagine, I would greatly benefit from a powerful Xeon processor.

My question is as follows: I've noticed some Intel Xeon Platinum 8468 (D0 revision) chips for sale on eBay. Which motherboard would be most suitable in this case? Additionally, what drawbacks should I expect from using an ES chip as opposed to a retail chip?

Thank you!
 

RolloZ170

Well-Known Member
Apr 24, 2016
5,276
1,595
113
My question is as follows: I've noticed some Intel Xeon Platinum 8468 (D0 revision) chips for sale on eBay. Which motherboard would be most suitable in this case?
this is D0 stepping, microcodes have revisions.
gigabyte C741 motherboards.
ASUS W790 boards (only D0 supported, not E0 and up)
 

pisiiki

New Member
Mar 3, 2024
10
0
1
this is D0 stepping, microcodes have revisions.
gigabyte C741 motherboards.
ASUS W790 boards (only D0 supported, not E0 and up)
Thanks for answering. What pros/cons are there for the C741 motherboards vs the W790? I plan on getting a 350W chip. Are both fine at this wattage?
 
Last edited:

Kizune

Member
Dec 2, 2022
40
31
18
Thanks for answering. What pros/cons are there for the C741 motherboards vs the W790? I plan to get a 350W chip. Are both fine at this wattage?
Asus W790 motherboards built to withstand much more than 350W - I mean they are made for overclockable Xeon W CPUs and has durability to unlock their potentials under liquid nitrogen cooling. Both ACE and SAGE variants have a second set of power connectors to accommodate hooking up two power supply’s because one 1600W PSU might not be enough. So 350W is nothing for them. As for Gigabyte the motherboard is rated for the 350W CPU so also should be Ok. Asus boards are either more expensive (SAGE costs about $1200 in US) or have fewer memory channels (ACE has 4 where comparable in price C741 board will have all 8). Asus boards have better support for desktop OS drivers - you will have an ability to manage fan speed, for example, from Windows where with Gigabyte you will have to get used to IPMI - either from command line or trough the web interface. Asus has additional hardware such as sound output and various 2.5g and 10g ethernets. And so on…
 

Civiloid

Member
Jan 15, 2024
38
22
8
What pros/cons are there for the C741 motherboards vs the W790?
It is a bit complicated question. BIOS are different, PCIe slot behavior would be different (Xeon D0 have 80 PCIe lanes, while Xeon WS have 56 or 112 and W790 motherboard will treat your Xeon as 56 PCIe Lane chip, so you'll have more usable slots in x8 mode on Gigabyte MS33-AR0 on a D0 Xeon CPU, compared to ASUS W790 Sage), ability to overclock memory is different (ASUS can use XMP profile and can take advantage of higher frequency memory, while in C741 boards you'll be limited to 4800 MHz, and as far as I remember reading the thread, D0 xeon can actually run with higher frequency memory on W790 boards).

You also need to keep in mind that VRM cooling on server boards is designed for a server airflow, so you will need to think about extra fans that will push the air through VRM area.
 
  • Like
Reactions: RolloZ170

pisiiki

New Member
Mar 3, 2024
10
0
1
Asus W790 motherboards built to withstand much more than 350W - I mean they are made for overclockable Xeon W CPUs and has durability to unlock their potentials under liquid nitrogen cooling. Both ACE and SAGE variants have a second set of power connectors to accommodate hooking up two power supply’s because one 1600W PSU might not be enough. So 350W is nothing for them. As for Gigabyte the motherboard is rated for the 350W CPU so also should be Ok. Asus boards are either more expensive (SAGE costs about $1200 in US) or have fewer memory channels (ACE has 4 where comparable in price C741 board will have all 8). Asus boards have better support for desktop OS drivers - you will have an ability to manage fan speed, for example, from Windows where with Gigabyte you will have to get used to IPMI - either from command line or trough the web interface. Asus has additional hardware such as sound output and various 2.5g and 10g ethernets. And so on…
Thanks for the clarification! I have decided to order the W790-E PRO SAGE SE. Now I need to decide on the CPU/MEM. Any recommendations going forward in the range of ~$600 ~350W ES CPUs? Best number of RAM sticks, speed? I'm going for 128GB of RAM for this machine.
 

RolloZ170

Well-Known Member
Apr 24, 2016
5,276
1,595
113
Thanks for the clarification! I have decided to order the W790-E PRO SAGE SE. Now I need to decide on the CPU/MEM.
Any recommendations going forward in the range of ~$600 ~350W ES CPUs?
nothing in that range except of overpriced ones.
QYFS/QYFR is best price perf. ratio so far. QYFX(8490H D0 ES2) clocks are lower
Best number of RAM sticks, speed? I'm going for 128GB of RAM for this machine.
8 channel is a must have(dual ch. per cpu tile), dual ranked for best performance.
unfortunaly Kingston Fury Remegade Pro's 5600/6000 32GB are single ranked.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JosefHrib

pisiiki

New Member
Mar 3, 2024
10
0
1
nothing in that range except of overpriced ones.
QYFS/QYFR is best price perf. ratio so far. QYFX(8490H D0 ES2) clocks are lower
Q0KG/8470 E0/S1 not a good idea? This one seems to fit my needs the best as I will be compiling tons of code from time to time and I still want to get a high clock for some casual gamming.

Gotcha with the RAM info too, thanks a lot for the advice!
 

Civiloid

Member
Jan 15, 2024
38
22
8
I will go with the W790 + QYFS/QYFR then
Honestly, for compiling, I would suggest analysing the bottlenecks first. Unless you run multiple independent jobs in parallel (as even with a single project, unless it was developed in a way to minimise cross-dependencies, you'll quickly hit a small number of compile tasks and therefore would benefit from higher 2-4-6 core frequency), you'd probably be better with just the top desktop CPU from either AMD or Intel, which would also be cheaper.
 

pisiiki

New Member
Mar 3, 2024
10
0
1
Honestly, for compiling, I would suggest analysing the bottlenecks first. Unless you run multiple independent jobs in parallel (as even with a single project, unless it was developed in a way to minimise cross-dependencies, you'll quickly hit a small number of compile tasks and therefore would benefit from higher 2-4-6 core frequency), you'd probably be better with just the top desktop CPU from either AMD or Intel, which would also be cheaper.
This is for my personal setup. I'll be engaging in gaming and hobby projects. This includes compiling Unreal Engine from almost scratch multiple times a day and experimenting with deep learning. At work, I have a Threadripper PRO 5995WX with 256GB of RAM, which builds significantly faster than any consumer CPU. The "affordable" ES Xeons caught my eye because, after deciding to replace my PC, I thought it would be wise to invest a bit more instead of blindly opting for a Z790/14900K setup. I prefer to spend a bit more money if it means saving time on builds or training. I will keep this machine for about 3 years or so I guess.