Intel Xeon E5-2670 Deal and Price Tracking

frogtech

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Jan 4, 2016
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I remember some folks around here talking about fan extension cables for these, and different part numbers, one of my rear chassis fans is just short enough that it doesn't reach one of the fan headers on the board's weird header placement. So far I see CBL-0216L and CBL-0336L, with the latter being longer. Will it work as an extension? Or is there another cable needed?
 

aj84

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Oct 28, 2015
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I think you'll be pushing it, I'm not sure which revision of the 836 I have but I honestly don't think it could anything more than 12x13.
Thanks for your reply! 12"x13" are the dimensions of the X9DRD-7LN4F-JBOD...isn't that the board you use? Do you have a picture how much space is around that, perhaps? Thanks anyway!

I remember some folks around here talking about fan extension cables for these, and different part numbers, one of my rear chassis fans is just short enough that it doesn't reach one of the fan headers on the board's weird header placement. So far I see CBL-0216L and CBL-0336L, with the latter being longer. Will it work as an extension? Or is there another cable needed?
Both are replacements for the existing ones in your SC836: one side of these cables can be clipped into the hot-swap cage of the fan (the other is for the motherboard)...but they should be prefectly usable as extension cables, too. (I can't see anything special about the cables from the fan cage to the motherboard. On the other hand: you could easily buy a regular 4-Pin extension cable for PWM-fans and extend the existing cable coming from the fan cage...did that for a X10 motherboard in the SC836 because of sourcing problems with the original supermicro cables.)
 

frogtech

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Thanks for your reply! 12"x13" are the dimensions of the X9DRD-7LN4F-JBOD...isn't that the board you use? Do you have a picture how much space is around that, perhaps? Thanks anyway!


Both are replacements for the existing ones in your SC836: one side of these cables can be clipped into the hot-swap cage of the fan (the other is for the motherboard)...but they should be prefectly usable as extension cables, too. (I can't see anything special about the cables from the fan cage to the motherboard. But you could easily buy a regular 4-Pin extension cable for PWM-fans and extend the existing one...did that for a X10 motherboard in the SC836.)
Thanks for the clarification and yeah I can get you some pics later when I get home.
 

whitey

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I gotta admit, the X9SRL-F was a TIGHT fit in my norco 2212/4224, like by a 1/8th of an inch width wise, I feel like I got lucky but I'm sure those cases are built for up to ATX mobo's.
 

CJ145

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Mar 11, 2015
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Thats a normal ATX fit in a 4u case with an ATX PSU on the side. I have an EATX board in the same case that goes to the fan wall too.
 

frogtech

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Thanks for your reply! 12"x13" are the dimensions of the X9DRD-7LN4F-JBOD...isn't that the board you use? Do you have a picture how much space is around that, perhaps? Thanks anyway!


Both are replacements for the existing ones in your SC836: one side of these cables can be clipped into the hot-swap cage of the fan (the other is for the motherboard)...but they should be prefectly usable as extension cables, too. (I can't see anything special about the cables from the fan cage to the motherboard. On the other hand: you could easily buy a regular 4-Pin extension cable for PWM-fans and extend the existing cable coming from the fan cage...did that for a X10 motherboard in the SC836 because of sourcing problems with the original supermicro cables.)
Pics as promised, x9drd-7ln4f-jbod installed in an sc836tq of an unknown revision. There's about just under 2 inches of room from the edge of the mobo to the wall of the PSU 'carrier' and just under 1 inch of room from the edge of the board to the front fan wall. no additional mounting holes are present in those areas.

sc836tq (unknown revision) + x9drd-7ln4f-jbod
 
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aj84

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Oct 28, 2015
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Pics as promised, x9drd-7ln4f-jbod installed in an sc836tq of an unknown revision. There's about just under 2 inches of room from the edge of the mobo to the wall of the PSU 'carrier' and just under 1 inch of room from the edge of the board to the front fan wall. no additional mounting holes are present in those areas.

sc836tq (unknown revision) + x9drd-7ln4f-jbod
Thank you very much! Looks like the "2 inches of room from the edge of the mobo to the wall of the PSU 'carrier'" are the room EE-ATX (13.68" x 13") would occupy additionally compared to your E-ATX (12" x 13"). I guess EE-ATX should fit...tight. :D ...but the standoff thingy could be a bit of a problem. :(

Regarding Chassis Revision: Look at the left or right outside of the chassis (where the inner rails would be mounted) -> there should be a white label starting with "C836..."; the letter at the 10th position seems to be the revision of the chassis (I got J's and A's...really old ones).
 

bmacklin

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Dec 10, 2013
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Pics as promised, x9drd-7ln4f-jbod installed in an sc836tq of an unknown revision. There's about just under 2 inches of room from the edge of the mobo to the wall of the PSU 'carrier' and just under 1 inch of room from the edge of the board to the front fan wall. no additional mounting holes are present in those areas.

sc836tq (unknown revision) + x9drd-7ln4f-jbod
Interesting the way you populated your dimms. Shouldn't you be using all blues or all blacks first so you can get the most bandwidth (quad channel across 2 cpus)? BTW, what kind of RAM are those? They look nice. ECC REG?
 
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frogtech

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I was just testing all the slots to make sure they worked and did each bank for each cpu at a time. They're just the standard Hynix HP rdimms all over ebay, 4GB ecc ddr3 1333. Nothin special!
 

bmacklin

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Dec 10, 2013
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I was just testing all the slots to make sure they worked and did each bank for each cpu at a time. They're just the standard Hynix HP rdimms all over ebay, 4GB ecc ddr3 1333. Nothin special!
Thanks! I just wanted to make sure I wasn't doing it wrong or anything. Good stuff!
 

SavageWS6

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Feb 2, 2016
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I was just testing all the slots to make sure they worked and did each bank for each cpu at a time. They're just the standard Hynix HP rdimms all over ebay, 4GB ecc ddr3 1333. Nothin special!
Curious myself, is there any real difference for a homelab application between 1333 and 1600? I know there is for all my personal "gaming" rigs and doing synthetic benchmarks.
 

T_Minus

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Feb 15, 2015
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Curious myself, is there any real difference for a homelab application between 1333 and 1600? I know there is for all my personal "gaming" rigs and doing synthetic benchmarks.
Likely no.

There are some good threads on the topic if you watn to search around :D
 

snclawson

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Feb 7, 2013
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I have to say that I'm very impressed at his much Intel has managed to lock down these CPUs! I hadn't quite realized just how much and since they were so cheap I figured that I'd buy another and run it in an X79 SP system and at least get a little boost over stock...

So far from what I can tell I'm getting exactly...nothing.

Per-core turbo limits are in full effect, as is the TDP limit (AFAIK, it's not getting hot enough to throttle). mprime running 16 threads with an AVX FFT pegs all the cores at base 2.6GHz. Running the older core2 FFT will get them up to the `7-8 core' turbo limit of 3.0GHz. It really does seem that server boards are the way to go, since it doesn't seem like there's much you can do other than stock with these.