ICX7150 for repair?

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JoshDi

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Jun 13, 2019
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What PSU model was that exactly? So I know what to avoid :D

My FSP200-P35-A54 seems to work fine, it fit nicely, works in a fanless configuration like this and was relatively cheap. I haven't done any extensive testing on it (only tested plugging in/out a few times with PoE load) but It Works For Me(tm).
that PSU seems fine for most but its only 150W so any significant POE load will most likely fail and could kill the PSU
 

LodeRunner

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Apr 27, 2019
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that PSU seems fine for most but its only 150W so any significant POE load will most likely fail and could kill the PSU
The original PSU is only rated for like 130W. My unit with an aftermarket PSU that I think is 150 W shows a PoE budge of 124W. The spec sheets for the various PSUs should have a output curve based on temp that would give you an idea of the actual safe loading limits.
 

JoshDi

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Jun 13, 2019
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The original PSU is only rated for like 130W. My unit with an aftermarket PSU that I think is 150 W shows a PoE budge of 124W. The spec sheets for the various PSUs should have a output curve based on temp that would give you an idea of the actual safe loading limits.
fair enough - I went for a 300w unit so temperature and output arnt an issue
 

LodeRunner

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Apr 27, 2019
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fair enough - I went for a 300w unit so temperature and output arnt an issue
What model? With 300W supply, I wonder what the PoE distribution board limit is.

Also the guy I bought the PSUs from a couple years ago seriously jacked up his prices, so trying to keep a list of alternatives in case one boes burn out on me.
 

JoshDi

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Jun 13, 2019
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What model? With 300W supply, I wonder what the PoE distribution board limit is.

Also the guy I bought the PSUs from a couple years ago seriously jacked up his prices, so trying to keep a list of alternatives in case one boes burn out on me.
I went with the MEAN WELL EPP-500-54, which required some modification (removal of some of the metal casing) to get it to fit. You can see my posts on page 6 of this thread

I am also looking for alternatives to fix these devices. I came across some on ebay but have to confirm they fit
 

ultrabay

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Oct 8, 2017
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I've been trying to repair a ICX7150 with no luck. I ordered a FSP200-P35-A54 and swapped it in and swapped the pins on the connector. I get 53~ volts out of the PSU but when I connect it to the switch board and give it power, the voltage drops off entirely. Never get any lights. I'm not seeing any burn marks but guessing the board is toast?
 
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ultrabay

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Oct 8, 2017
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I did swap the pins because from what I could tell the polarity was backwards on the new board. This is how it is currently wired.

White is positive voltage is black is negative voltage.

IMG_4265_smol.jpg

Just to sanity check - this is the correct polarity right?

smol_pinout.jpg

Also as an aside for anyone who is retrofitting FSP200-P35-A54: There seems to be a 12V header (presumably for a fan) below the five capacitors in my picture. Would this actually help power supply longevity? I don't know but it's there.
 
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JoshDi

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so I just bought another one of these icx7150-c12p for parts (its in the mail). Hopefully its just the PSU and not faulty ram. I bought two FSP200-P35-A54 from digi-key for 55ish dollars each with taxes, tariff and shipping (figured ill have another one of these on hand to sell or use for another repair when another one pops up on ebay at a good price).

If it happens to not be the PSU.... has anyone done any other repairs on these? I imagine replacing the RAM chips would be pretty difficult, even with a reflow oven.

The last one I bought (and repaired earlier in this thread) would turn on for about 1 second and then turn off. This one looks really clean inside but the seller told me that it doesnt light up at all when plugged in. Hopefully its still the PSU (its the same seller I bought from before).

Anyway, just looking if anyone here has fixed these switches in any other ways - when they fail for other reasons than just the PSU.
 

JoshDi

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Jun 13, 2019
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alright! fixed another one of these with the FSP200-P35-A54. I had to flip the white and black 6 pins to get it to work - not sure why monotux and ultrabay did not.

I also had a weird issue where it was blowing my breaker. It was due to the AC two pin connector hitting the bottom of the switch frame - causing a short.

I fixed it by putting some electrical tape, removing the footing screw on that one side and not using the screw over there.
 
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Dade49

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Mar 26, 2021
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I've fixed my first unit using the FSP200-P35-A54 PSU from Digi-Key. It was about $60 shipped with taxes.

The original PSU has 8 screws securing the PCB: 4 inner and 4 outer screws. To remove the PSU, just remove the 4 outer screws and gently pull. There is a thermal pad underneath that you will want to reuse. I reused almost everything. Remove the 4 side screws holding the power components to the heatsink (you won't reuse these). Remove the 4 inner screws (you won't reuse these either). Pry a little on the sides of the components to separate the board from the heatsink. The board will come out once it's free. Save and reuse the thermal pad from the big IC that's attached to the inside of the heatsink. I placed this on the black metal thermal bar on the new PSU, making better contact with the heatsink during reinstallation.

Remove the white plastic film from the bottom and save the thermal pad inside attached to the bottom for the new PSU. The white plastic film has 4 holes for the inner screws; we no longer need these. Cover these holes with electrical tape. One of the holes is your AC lead wire, so be sure it's hole is well insulated. I had some interference issues with the new PSU and the 4 inner screw studs attached to the heat sync. Remove all 4 inner studs from the heatsink since we can't reuse them anyway. They're just pressed in and can be removed with pliers. I didn't need to grind them down or anything. I put the inner screws in backwards to give my pliers some leverage to tweak them enough to pull each of them out.

Now that your heatsink no longer has any studs, reassemble everything with the new PSU but only use the 4 outer screws. I was able to get everything back together properly/secure with just the 4 outer screws, including the top & bottom plastic covers. You absolutely DO need to swap the pins on the power cable as previously mentioned. The PSU datasheet clearly shows which 3 wires are ground and which are +12V. The PCB board also indicates this. I used the tip of a pocketknife to get each wire out, one at a time. It takes some patience, but I prefer this to trying to swap and potentially break the connector on the new PSU. Push each pin in further into the connector, then depress the clip with a knife or tool, then pull it out. Also, since the board is clearly marked, the cable should now match the new board in case someone else comes along to look at it later on.

There's also a ground spade connector on the new PSU board. I decided to connect it to the chassis grounding screw. This is probably optional, but more grounding is better IMO. The old PSU was only putting out 48V, making a weird squealing noise, and constantly wrote the following error over and over again each second to the console:

PoE Fatal: Vmain (48V) fault has forced all ports on slot 0 to lose power.

I'm glad this switch is finally working with a new power supply. PM me if you've got questions on the PSU install.
 
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Indecided

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Sep 5, 2015
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Exactly 2 years after the first failure, I have had a second PSU failure now. Seems to be extremely hit or miss, 2 out of 3 isn't a great statistic.

Not a total PSU failure, we're getting POE shutdowns -

Sep 10 14:26:22:C:System: U1-MSG: PoE Severe Error: PSU voltage is higher than max limit. Port 1/1/11 powered down. RMA the PSU.

The switch is in a ventilated rack, but runs hot at about 165f.

I've ordered a few Delta FSP120-AWAN3 external bricks which i've been eyeing for a few years now.
It will take a bit of rewiring, but hopefully with the PSU out of the chassis the reliability will be better.