ICX7150 for repair?

fohdeesha

Kaini Industries
Nov 20, 2016
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fohdeesha.com
keep in mind one of the headers is backwards compared to the stock PSU, I think it was the DC connector I had to plug in backwards

been using it for like 6 months now, zero issues, the filtering and everything is identical from what I remember, even the filter caps had the same part number
 

Indecided

Active Member
Sep 5, 2015
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I have two of the ones fohdeesha mentioned on order and arriving soon. Just asking the vendor for the sake of any one else here. It might be easier for others as it would be drop in with no custom wiring or mounts.

The pins are tied together on the power supply pcb for current handling. 3 blacks are negative and the 3 whites are positive 54v. They're likely tied together on the switch as well. I got it to power up with 2 wires and my bench 48v supply.
Do you mind snapping a picture of the PSU within the case? Just trying to get an idea of space available, if it's as spacious as the 6450-c12 it would be nice.

Edit - Oh don't bother, i'm blind, your imgur link has more then a single picture. stay-at-home-fever this is.
 

Indecided

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Sep 5, 2015
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keep in mind one of the headers is backwards compared to the stock PSU, I think it was the DC connector I had to plug in backwards

been using it for like 6 months now, zero issues, the filtering and everything is identical from what I remember, even the filter caps had the same part number
Good to know. I might just bite the bullet...

The plastic base pin-guide can probably be pulled right out re-orient 180 degrees to retain the locking functionality, usually for this kind only the pins are soldered and the plastic is a pure friction fit since there is no strain relief needed.
 

Indecided

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Sep 5, 2015
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Just to confirm, based on reading, the switches are shipped with 1GBe uplinks, however the difference with the 7 series is self authenticated licensing (SAU) - meaning no serial numbers need to be entered to upgrade to 10GBe ala the Cisco RTU honor system?
 

n17ikh

Member
Jul 12, 2019
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I just bought one, if all these need is a power supply then that's great. If it's a board failure I'll be sad but that's the ebay life. Looks like there's only a couple left now.
 

LodeRunner

Active Member
Apr 27, 2019
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Fingers crossed here. Will get mine between the 10th and 14th with PSU arriving in the same time frame.
 

Indecided

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Sep 5, 2015
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In case any of you are feeling like overkill, MeanWell has a 9.26A 54V PSU that can fit in the same space as the original PSU (based on dimensions and spec sheet, they match up). It even has the metal plate backing similar to the original.

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/MEAN-WELL/EPP-500-54?qs=3HJ2avRr9PI0nEEcfVQcaw==

If you shop around, you should be able to find them a bit cheaper then list. At least you know it's not going to be a insufficient current situation if you buy this monster. :D

It does expect 25CFM though, so this may have been the challenge with the original PSU where it simply died a hot-baked death, granted this PSU does put out almost 4x more amperage.
 
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Dreece

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Jan 22, 2019
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...It does expect 25CFM though, so this may have been the challenge with the original PSU where it simply died a hot-baked death, granted this PSU does put out almost 4x more amperage.
As most already know, Cisco and Juniper equivalent compact fanless models have a huge heatsink out the rear and have pretty much all the high heat generation components of the psu attached to it.

s-l1600.jpg

Maybe a possible external heatsink mod could help retain the fanless aspect of these Ruckus switches whilst alleviating death by heat issues. Though looking at those PSUs, it doesn't look an easy mod to achieve unless one is willing to destroy the streamlined appearance of the switch.

Another potential solution is to maybe consider relocating the PSU in an external project box with an elaborate heatsink mod or to keep it simple a noctua 140mm fan, meaning no need to be concerned about location of switch as such.... otherwise probably wise to make sure they are placed in an open area where heat-buildup is of no concern for longterm survival.
 
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bubsterboo

Member
Dec 15, 2019
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I received the SL Power supplies. Thanks fohdeesha for recommending them. They seem to work with surprisingly little effort required for installation. The screw terminals even line up!

Here's some photos of my PSU replacement:
ICX7150 PSU Replacement

Some notes:
- The output side is backwards as mentioned. I flipped them by popping out the pins.
- The input side is correct. However, the plastic clip on the pin header doesn't quite fit so i pulled it off and swapped the platic clip with the original power supplys.
- I used the plastic shield from the original powersupply to help isolate it from the ground of the chassis
- Screwed it down with the plastic original plastic cover. That's about it!


Oh. And it goes without saying. Do this at your own risk. There's high voltage involed! Also worth mentioning the heatsinks on the SL power supply are live. So don't touch them when it's plugged in!
 

mrrensing01

Member
Dec 9, 2015
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I am 1 for 2 successfully repaired, though the failed repair was my fault. I couldn't read the silk screen on the old PSU and wasn't getting any output voltage on one of the new SL PSUs. Plugged it in without reversing the DC output and got a lot of sparks. Switch looks to be toast for now.

Moved on to the second unit and easy peasy repair with the output correctly reversed.

Initial testing of the original PSUs points to busted fuses in the units I got. If that's the case, the cause of death for these two might not have been heat related.
 

bubsterboo

Member
Dec 15, 2019
39
17
8
Initial testing of the original PSUs points to busted fuses in the units I got. If that's the case, the cause of death for these two might not have been heat related.
Where is the fuse located on the PSU?

I tried to look into my stock PSU failures. Here's what I found:
PSU 1
- Mains voltage was present after the rectifier and at the filter caps
- Filter cap votlage was around 150v
- PSU showed no signs of life. Connected an oscilloscope to the gate on one of the mosfets and it does absolutely nothing. As if the switching controller is getting no power.

PSU 2
- Mains voltage was present after the rectifier and at the filter caps
- Filer cap voltage was around 300v. There is a "Power factor Correction" transformer. I'm not an expert on this power supply. But i assume this portion of the circuit is boosting the primary side voltage.
- The power supply bursts into action for around 300ms when powered up and then goes into shutdown mode.
- The voltage on the output spikes at around 90v when powered on so i assume it's going into over-voltage protection and shutting down.
 

LodeRunner

Active Member
Apr 27, 2019
431
181
43
I received the SL Power supplies. Thanks fohdeesha for recommending them. They seem to work with surprisingly little effort required for installation. The screw terminals even line up!

Here's some photos of my PSU replacement:
ICX7150 PSU Replacement

Some notes:
- The output side is backwards as mentioned. I flipped them by popping out the pins.
- The input side is correct. However, the plastic clip on the pin header doesn't quite fit so i pulled it off and swapped the platic clip with the original power supplys.
- I used the plastic shield from the original powersupply to help isolate it from the ground of the chassis
- Screwed it down with the plastic original plastic cover. That's about it!


Oh. And it goes without saying. Do this at your own risk. There's high voltage involed! Also worth mentioning the heatsinks on the SL power supply are live. So don't touch them when it's plugged in!
Is the first picture showing the two pins that need to be flipped?
 

bubsterboo

Member
Dec 15, 2019
39
17
8
Is the first picture showing the two pins that need to be flipped?
All 6 have to be flipped. The entire connector needs to be reversed.

If you're not sure about this I would suggest sharing a photo before you plug it in. You will damage something if this is done wrong.
 

mrrensing01

Member
Dec 9, 2015
45
10
8
Where is the fuse located on the PSU?

I tried to look into my stock PSU failures. Here's what I found:
PSU 1
- Mains voltage was present after the rectifier and at the filter caps
- Filter cap votlage was around 150v
- PSU showed no signs of life. Connected an oscilloscope to the gate on one of the mosfets and it does absolutely nothing. As if the switching controller is getting no power.

PSU 2
- Mains voltage was present after the rectifier and at the filter caps
- Filer cap voltage was around 300v. There is a "Power factor Correction" transformer. I'm not an expert on this power supply. But i assume this portion of the circuit is boosting the primary side voltage.
- The power supply bursts into action for around 300ms when powered up and then goes into shutdown mode.
- The voltage on the output spikes at around 90v when powered on so i assume it's going into over-voltage protection and shutting down.
There's a 4A fuse next to the AC input header, though I didn't drill a whole lot deeper. I tossed them back in a box after I got one switch working...just moved and I don't have everything unpacked yet. Will take another look after I get my bench set up.
 

jzeus

New Member
Jan 22, 2017
19
4
3
Where is the fuse located on the PSU?

I tried to look into my stock PSU failures. Here's what I found:
PSU 1
- Mains voltage was present after the rectifier and at the filter caps
- Filter cap votlage was around 150v
- PSU showed no signs of life. Connected an oscilloscope to the gate on one of the mosfets and it does absolutely nothing. As if the switching controller is getting no power.

PSU 2
- Mains voltage was present after the rectifier and at the filter caps
- Filer cap voltage was around 300v. There is a "Power factor Correction" transformer. I'm not an expert on this power supply. But i assume this portion of the circuit is boosting the primary side voltage.
- The power supply bursts into action for around 300ms when powered up and then goes into shutdown mode.
- The voltage on the output spikes at around 90v when powered on so i assume it's going into over-voltage protection and shutting down.
The stock power supply users a TEA1716T https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/data-sheet/TEA1716T.pdf . Should be able to track down what is wrong.
 

bubsterboo

Member
Dec 15, 2019
39
17
8
The stock power supply users a TEA1716T https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/data-sheet/TEA1716T.pdf . Should be able to track down what is wrong.
Yup. Found that document. It's difficult to probe the IC as it's pretty hidden away on a daughter board. I was able to probe the feedback on the other side of the optocoupler and it appears to be working.
At this point I think i'm going to let it be since I have working PSU replacements. But I'm very interested if anyone else can diagnose thier power supplies and what the problem was.
 

LodeRunner

Active Member
Apr 27, 2019
431
181
43
All 6 have to be flipped. The entire connector needs to be reversed.

If you're not sure about this I would suggest sharing a photo before you plug it in. You will damage something if this is done wrong.
Gotcha. Going to mark the wires then. need to find my pin popper/remover...I had one for modding fans to fit a Dell PE2900 (loud, power hungry bastard that I'm glad to be rid of).
 

Indecided

Active Member
Sep 5, 2015
153
74
28
As most already know, Cisco and Juniper equivalent compact fanless models have a huge heatsink out the rear and have pretty much all the high heat generation components of the psu attached to it.

View attachment 13447

Maybe a possible external heatsink mod could help retain the fanless aspect of these Ruckus switches whilst alleviating death by heat issues. Though looking at those PSUs, it doesn't look an easy mod to achieve unless one is willing to destroy the streamlined appearance of the switch.

Another potential solution is to maybe consider relocating the PSU in an external project box with an elaborate heatsink mod or to keep it simple a noctua 140mm fan, meaning no need to be concerned about location of switch as such.... otherwise probably wise to make sure they are placed in an open area where heat-buildup is of no concern for longterm survival.
If you're up to get an external PSU, Delta makes a ADP-150AR B brick that outputs 54v @ 2.78A
(more leeway!) and comes in either a miniDIN connector. I've seen a different model# that has a 2 pin molex-type connector, similiar to some Fortigate PSUs.

Delta Electronics ADP-150AR B 54V 2.78A 6-pin Power Adapter - Grade A from PCLiquidations $17.97!

 
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Skud

Active Member
Jan 3, 2012
139
73
28
I picked-up three of these and so far I'm two for two. I have one more yet to open-up.

The first unit would power-on for a split second and then nothing. Voltage on the output would start at 90v then settle at 10v after 60 seconds or so. The second one was a hard 0v with no life. After the PSU swap they're working fine.

These seem to be from some sort of apartment complex. LOTS of VLANs. I stopped at ~475 when doing a show run. I have a co-worker who recently moved into a "smart home" that came with Ruckus APs and a switch, so I think this is something similar.

If you take apart the original PSU there is a good piece of insulating plastic which can be reused. I'm also reusing the heat-conducting mats that go between the PSU and chassis. Can't hurt!

I've preferred to swap the original board-side connectors since the ones on my PSU don't match at all - completely different style. I have no doubt they would hold just due to friction it only takes a couple minutes to swap them around.

Riley
 

Skud

Active Member
Jan 3, 2012
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So, three for three..

The last one I think lived a hot life. There was a lot of white dust inside and parts of the black plastic PCB covers were starting to crumble. I blew out the white dust and then felt oddly energetic and focused.

Anyways, after the PSU replacement it booted right-up. Seems to have come from the same place. Config had lots of VLANs. This one started at 2000 and I stopped around 3500.

Thank you once again fohdeesha for your wealth of knowledge and to everyone else who contributed to this thread!

Riley