First server: Dell EMC PowerEdge T40 Xeon Quad-Core with Ubuntu with GUI

Navnetsen

New Member
Aug 17, 2021
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Hello everyone,

Background story
It is time for me "have" my own server. I have decided that I need a physical server, that I can touch and operate. I need control over it and I need to learn how to use it and so on.

I have been running a "faux-server" on my desktop from time to time. I ran some of my own applications/scripts, a website, and some data storage.

Now it is time to step up, but I am a bit lost as to what entry is the best for me.

OS
I have googled a bit and found that Ubuntu could be a decent OS to begin with. I have some experience with Linux (Mint and Peppermint).

However, it also seems that my inexperience would require for me to start out with an Ubuntu version in which the GUI is included.

Hardware
Once again, I googled, and found a guide for start-up servers and someone recommended the Dell EMC T30. I could not find that model in my country. Most models are either very pricy or simply not available to me. Yet, I found the Dell EMC PowerEdge T40 Xeon Quad-Core for a very good price. I have attached an image with the specs.

Questions
  1. Would it be fine for me to start with the Dell-server above? (Is it overkill/underkill?)
  2. Is Ubuntu a good OS for such a server?
  3. Could I use Ubuntu with a GUI for the dell-server (until I get confident without it)?
  4. Anything else I need to consider?
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ari2asem

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Dec 26, 2018
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well, to mes around and to learn things about ubuntu with gui is good enough. although you can add 1 memory Ram stick to get 16gb of Ram.
because your Ram of 8gb is little bit on lower side
 
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Navnetsen

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Aug 17, 2021
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well, to mes around and to learn things about ubuntu with gui is good enough. although you can add 1 memory Ram stick to get 16gb of Ram.
because your Ram of 8gb is little bit on lower side
Thank you for your answer, it is much appreciated!

Is there a benchmark to go for in terms of ram. And how far would I be able to go with this server?

Is it realistic to start with 16 gb of ram in that machine and run a website, have less than 50 gb of data storage, and run a few java applications all at the same time for 24/7?
 

ari2asem

Active Member
Dec 26, 2018
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The Netherlands, Groningen
you can start your testing phase just with 8gb Ram.

just simple...if your system is getting alower, then add another 8gb ram stick.

install ubuntu desktop (if you like gui), mess around and make your decision. your cpu is powerfull enough for messing / playing around
 

Navnetsen

New Member
Aug 17, 2021
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That sounds pretty good.

How do you make benchmarks for when the system is getting slower? And when do I know if it is a ram issue or a CPU issue?

Would this ram be ok:
Crucial DDR4 16GB 2,666MHz DDR4 SDRAM DIMM 288-PIN
 
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ari2asem

Active Member
Dec 26, 2018
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138
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The Netherlands, Groningen
i guess that Ram of Crucial will not work, because your another Ram on mainboard is ecc-reg memory. but this is my guess.

to know for sure...take out the ram stick from mainboard, search for model name/number, google for it and find out it is ecc-reg (rdimm) or unbuffered (udimm).
udimm can also be ecc. watch out for it
 

Navnetsen

New Member
Aug 17, 2021
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But couldnt I replace the 8gb with two of the crucial?

There are almost no eec's in my country. I read online that you could swap for non-eec and it would work still.
 

Navnetsen

New Member
Aug 17, 2021
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Ok. I did specifically read regarding this server. Either way, I will test it out. Thank you a lot for your feedback. It has helped me a ton!

Is this a site where I pick best answer? Because if so, your answer gets it.
 
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Navnetsen

New Member
Aug 17, 2021
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Maybe I didn't need a physical one, but I want one. Having something physically close is more real to me. Maybe it is more expensive and a worse overall experience, but on the other hand, it makes something feel real. Especially in a world where most of your products and experiences are just numbers on a screen. Having something physical in front of you, something that you can touch and feel, is real. If that makes sense.

I had a contract this month that paid the equivalent of my monthly wage in my consultancy job. I finished the contract in 8 hours. But it doesn't feel like a real thing since it is just code on a screen. An app running in the background. It feels like I am "only" the business consultant. Yet, maybe once I have a physical server, a desk, a chair etc., it will feel like I am running a business (or not).

It doesn't always make sense what is important to us. But a server was always a big thing in my mind. A milestone. The idea of just going with AWS or some local service does not feel like I would have reached that milestone.