ES Xeon Discussion

Nanotech

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Aug 1, 2016
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How do you think the 2667 V2 would stand against the V3?
If we use the production processor comparison on Intel's ark:

Intel® Product Specification Comparison

The V2 has a slight-moderate lead in terms of turbo boost and base clock speed (400mhz more turbo boost and 100mhz more on base clock speed). The IPC difference may not be enough to catch up with the turbo boost difference even if it is using DDR4.
 

udlr

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Sep 11, 2017
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E5-2667 V3 QEYY:

Intel Xeon E5-2667 V3 ES QEYY 3.2GHz 8Core 20MB 140W LGA2011-3 CPU Processor | eBay

It's the highest clocked ES2 V3 Xeon I've found. There is also the QEYA but that is an ES2 clocked at 2.9Ghz. It's also 8c/16t which should be sufficient for most tasks. However if you need a higher core version that boosts to 3.0Ghz+ on all cores it will definitely get more expensive.
Thank you!

What about those with more than 10 cores? Do you by any chance have a list of all those 3.0GHz+ (both normal and turbo clocks) CPUs?

I have a budget of EUR 600,- for the CPU.
 

vegeta

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Aug 22, 2017
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I'm hitting issues with my DeLuxe II (Consumer X99, LGA 2011 v3) and with my Z10-PE-D16.

The only stable systems are the Supermicro's. Fortunately I do have 2x 2620 v4 for a low price, but I'd like to scale above motherboards up.

The Asus Z10-PE-D16's second socket doesn't even work with my official Xeons though.
 

wildpig1234

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I'm hitting issues with my DeLuxe II (Consumer X99, LGA 2011 v3) and with my Z10-PE-D16.

The only stable systems are the Supermicro's. Fortunately I do have 2x 2620 v4 for a low price, but I'd like to scale above motherboards up.

The Asus Z10-PE-D16's second socket doesn't even work with my official Xeons though.
2nd socket doesn't work at all? that's weird? I am running dual 2686 v3 QS right now on same MB...
 

vegeta

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It doesn't work with legit Xeon CPU's, err, I'll try again in a bit and else I'll RMA it. It's a new board, never worked, but good to know that this set-up should work fine.
 

Nanotech

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It doesn't work with legit Xeon CPU's, err, I'll try again in a bit and else I'll RMA it. It's a new board, never worked, but good to know that this set-up should work fine.
X99 Deluxe II should work with QS level or production V4 Xeons. ES2 or pre-QS may not work. I would try with the replacement motherboard and see if it still works. If you can just make sure the bios is up to date.
 

Nanotech

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My bios is up to date. My stepping says 0000, is that bad?

I got these CPU's.

Intel Xeon E5 V4 ES 12C/24T 1,7 - 2,3 GHz Sockel 2011-3 x99 65W ähnlich 2628L v4 | eBay
€129 $150

Intel Xeon E5 2630 V4 ES QHVK 2.1GHz 25MB 10Core 20threads 14nm 85W CPU
€150 $175

I also have real 2620 V4's, got them for €200. Warranty until 2020.

Could you explain a little more?
Yes those are ES2 processors which means they will not work with the X99 Deluxe II. The CPU-Z stepping should show 1. If it shows 0 it's an ES2 which isn't compatible. Only QS (qualification sample) or production processors will work with the X99 Deluxe II (that applies to other ASUS X99 motherboards and V4 ES Xeons).
 
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vegeta

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Aug 22, 2017
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I appreciate that!

You would run FreeNAS safely on a server with a QS CPU, but not with a ES2 CPU, right?

I might use a real Intel CPU for FreeNAS via Vmware passthrough and the ES2 CPU's for some other virtual machines.
 

Nanotech

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I appreciate that!

You would run FreeNAS safely on a server with a QS CPU, but not with a ES2 CPU, right?

I might use a real Intel CPU for FreeNAS via Vmware passthrough and the ES2 CPU's for some other virtual machines.
If stability is a concern and it is a mission critical environment I would run it on a QS CPU which aside from microcode string detection is practically identical to a production processor. I wouldn't necessarily do it on an ES2 if it's mission critical.
 

vegeta

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My concern would be microcode that would interpret CREATE file as DELETE file, so data loss.

It's homelab, but I'd be nice to have an estimate of how much you can trust it.
 

PaulMD

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I picked up a Gigabyte GA-X99-SLI for free and was looking to put a Xeon ES on it. Here's the support list.

This rig is mostly going to be doing video encoding so my goal is to maximize multi-threaded performance (lots of cores). I'd like to keep this as cheap as possible with a worthwhile level of performance. I could maybe do $300 if there was a significant step in performance, but my ideal price range is $150-200. I certainly don't mind high-clock options, but from the looking I've done the price increases pretty drastically for anything more than 6 cores and the higher core count seems like a better fit for my needs (and also more efficient).

Model QEYN (2650v3, 10C with 2.2 GHz base) seems to be the sweet spot to me, the list says it supports stepping M0, and I've successfully used one on a similar board (Gigabyte GA-X99-UD4). I don't see the QEYP (2658 v3) on the support list, but one person here reported success with it on a Gigabyte board. Am I missing any other good options here given my price range?

Thanks for your help!
 

Nanotech

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Why do you use these 4 letter codes like QEYN? GA-X99-SLI (rev. 1.0) | Motherboard | GIGABYTE is just a list of all supported CPU's from socket 2011-3, so I guess all CPU's.

Gigabyte would never publicize which ES you can use, right?

QEYN (Intel Xeon 2.2 GHz) at least shows the clock speed is the same, which is better than my CPU's.
Motherboard manufacturers do not publish typically compatibility with engineering samples because they can only publish compatibility with production processors. There's also another reason for that and that is because Intel considers "ES" illegal to own and doesn't want motherboard manufacturers advertising or supporting them (even though they often are supported). The 4 digit number/code is known as the S-SPEC and denotes the processors characteristics (clock speeds, etc...)
 

wildpig1234

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I ve always wonder why there are so many es qs cpu around.. I thought you only do a limited run of samples of prototypes to test out before the production. . You dont see like a bucket load of prototype aircrafts... granted aircraft a lot more expensive to build
 

TType85

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I ve always wonder why there are so many es qs cpu around.. I thought you only do a limited run of samples of prototypes to test out before the production. . You dont see like a bucket load of prototype aircrafts... granted aircraft a lot more expensive to build
There are a lot of review samples that are sent out. If you ever watch any of the youtube tech channels they a lot of the time do not have retail chips on the new stuff. I also doubt when a company is making server hardware they only get a couple chips to test with from intel.
 

wildpig1234

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but how can company making server hardware be testing on these cpus that are significantly different from the retail esp with the earlier ES steppings?
 

Nanotech

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There are a lot of review samples that are sent out. If you ever watch any of the youtube tech channels they a lot of the time do not have retail chips on the new stuff. I also doubt when a company is making server hardware they only get a couple chips to test with from intel.
Exactly. Look at reviews and reviewers. 99% of the time they test on QS samples which are 99.9% identical to a production processor whether it be a Xeon or an i3/i5/i7. Usually those QS are also the finalized QS samples as it rarely goes to QS2 stages (unless there is a later revision)