(Sold) Intel DC p3605 1.6TB PCIe SSD ~ $160/BO Auto Accepted

Glock24

New Member
May 13, 2019
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Today arrived both of my drives. One shows 1045GB written, the other one shows 349GB written. I'll run tests to make sure they are OK.
 

Glock24

New Member
May 13, 2019
12
3
3
I tyested the drives with full read, full write and then full test with the Intel SSD Toolbox. Both drives came ot ok.

As for testing performance, I was only getting ~1200MB/s, then I realized the CPU was an Sandy Bridge i3, so I only had PCI-Ea, so Iswapped it for a IB Xeon to get PCI-E 3 speeds. After this the computer froze mid-boot and then did not boot at all. The motherboard is a X9SCL (no IPMI). After powering up it beeped 18 times. I removed all cards, RAM and drives, and got a memory error (5 short beeps, 1 long beep). I put back the RAM and now I get 6 beeps. Resetting the BIOS did nothing. 6 and 18 beeps are nowhere to be found for Supermicro beep codes.

I was afraid my "new" drives got damaged, so I took the CPU and put it in another X9SCL and it started correctly and the drives were now working @PCI-E 3 speeds. One drive reaches 2600MB/s, the other one ~2200-2300MB/s for reads.

What could have happened to my other board?

Edit: Forgot to mention, the P3605 are bootable on the X9SCL, I guess it'll be bootable on the X9SRL-F and the X10 boards too. I'll try later.
 
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hippyhappo

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Oct 3, 2016
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Just a heads up to anybody experiencing issues: these Intel AOCs tend to run pretty hot and despite the big heatsink, still need decent airflow through them to function properly. If you're using them in a larger case / anything with slower fans, you should be able to change the PowerGovernorMode setting using Intel SSD toolbox to lower the power consumption. This will obviously slow down the SSD at the top end, but should result in more manageable temps and more consistent performance.
 
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samat.io

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Sep 16, 2016
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Just a heads up to anybody experiencing issues: these Intel AOCs tend to run pretty hot and despite the big heatsink, still need decent airflow through them to function properly. If you're using them in a larger case / anything with slower fans, you should be able to change the PowerGovernorMode setting using Intel SSD toolbox to lower the power consumption. This will obviously slow down the SSD at the top end, but should result in more manageable temps and more consistent performance.
Instructions for Linux:

1. Get Intel SSD Data Center tool for Linux Download Intel® SSD Data Center Tool (Intel® SSD DCT), install (I used deb package)
2. Get serial number: sudo isdct show -a -intelssd
3. Set governor mode: sudo isdct set -intelssd $SERIAL PowerGovernorMode=1

Where governor mode is one of:
0: 25-watts for PCIe NVMedevices; 40W for PCIe NVMex8 devices; Unconstrained for SATA devices.
1: 20-watts for PCIeNVMedevices;35W for PCIe NVMex8 devices;Typical (7-watts) for SATA devices.
2: 10-watts forPCIeNVMedevices; 25W for PCIe NVMex8 devices; Low (5-watts) for SATA devices.

ref:
https://www.intel.com/content/dam/s...nd-storage/Intel_SSD_DCT_3_0_x_User_Guide.pdf
 
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