MS-01140mm Blow Job (NSFW)

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NerdAshes

Active Member
Jan 6, 2024
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Eastside of Westside Washington
Warning this is NSFW (Not Safe For Wallet)! Your warranty and/or return options will be gone.

I'd buy a big hole saw and use the drill press for the fan hole (...or if you have a sexy mill, use that) - (... or 3d print). I did a much uglier jigsaw and vice method. The flow was;

  • Remove the bottom case (8 screws) and drill two specific (noted below) top existing holes, slightly bigger for the fan's mounting screws.
  • Use protection. Metal will be flying around now. The Jig Saw will be loud. E&E folks. (eyes & ears)
  • Mount the fan using the two slightly bigger holes and use a Markal Silver-Streak Holder with Reflective Lead (the lead insert is skinny enough to mark the holes through the fan holes), to mark the holes for rear and trace the fan opening. Don't pick your nose or rub yours eyes now.. it is a lead insert. Wash you hands, swap your gloves, whatever you need to do.
  • Drill the 2 rear holes and a bigger hole, near the edge of the fan opening trace line (for the jigsaw blade).
  • Mount the case top in a vice and use the jigsaw with a bi-metal cutting blade, to cut out the fan opening. Pro-tip attach a bit of wood (using the screw holes) that sticks out further than the case. Use the wood to grip with the vise - to not mar the paint of the case. At the very least, use something (cardboard/rubber/etc.) to keep the vise's jaws soft.
  • Paint the exposed steel (I used matte black Krylon Fusion) to prevent rust.
  • Attach the fan mount screws from the inside, to the fan mounted on the outside of the case.
  • Put the face-plate (falls off when you remove the bottom) and bottom, back on the case.


Mount 140mm USB Fan To MS-01 (2).jpg
Remove these 8 screws to get to the top of case - from the inside.
Mount 140mm USB Fan To MS-01 (3).jpg

Mounting the fan from the inside once you're done making the hole (don't forget to paint any exposed metal).
Mount 140mm USB Fan To MS-01 (4).jpg

This is the hole to enlarge for your first mount.
Mount 140mm USB Fan To MS-01 (5).jpg

Hole size I ended up with after cut-out.
Mount 140mm USB Fan To MS-01 (6).jpg

Here is a 3-way of MS-01, all up in each others business. So hawt!
MS-01 Stack.jpg

How loud is it with several switches and three MS-01 with 140mm fans? See below. This is 6" above the MS-01 (and mostly the switches).
Sound LVL.jpg
That is all I've got - enjoy your 140mm blow job! ;-p
 
Last edited:

nexox

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May 3, 2023
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I'd buy a big hole saw and use the drill press for the fan hole
Most drill presses run far too fast for a holesaw that size in wood, let alone metal. Your best bet is a cordless drill with a clutch, they run low speed and the clutch will save you from breaking your wrist when the saw catches. Clamp the piece to a scrap of wood, if you have a drill press you can use it to pre-drill the center hole nice and square, then run the hand drill very slowly with a good amount of pressure, trying to make sure it cuts evenly around the entire perimeter. File or dremel the edges smooth and you should be good.

Still, your work looks better than many of my fan mods over the years, nice job.
 
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GreenAvacado

Active Member
Sep 25, 2022
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Interesting mod there. Good job!

What variant of MS-01 is this? My impression was that all of them had grilled case little push button and pull out mechanism, not 8 screws like you have show in this picture.
 

NerdAshes

Active Member
Jan 6, 2024
110
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28
Eastside of Westside Washington
Most drill presses run far too fast for a holesaw that size in wood, let alone metal. Your best bet is a cordless drill with a clutch, they run low speed and the clutch will save you from breaking your wrist when the saw catches. Clamp the piece to a scrap of wood, if you have a drill press you can use it to pre-drill the center hole nice and square, then run the hand drill very slowly with a good amount of pressure, trying to make sure it cuts evenly around the entire perimeter. File or dremel the edges smooth and you should be good.

Still, your work looks better than many of my fan mods over the years, nice job.
I guess everyone doesn't have a metalwork drill press..

There are super slow drill presses and most are adjustable (via belts). Nexox is right though - probably still to fast for a big hole saw.
Also for all the drilling you do with metal especially - use a clamping system. I have a couple of good scars and learned that lesson well. Don't ever hold the item - it's shocking how fast that twist will get out of hand.

I did also use a metal file (and a oscillating spindle sander) - metal slivers suck.

I did a rush job because I know I'll rarely look inside the box (didn't want to post the pics lol). If you take your time it'll look much better ;-)
 
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nexox

Well-Known Member
May 3, 2023
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I guess everyone doesn't have a metalwork drill press..
I had a metalwork drill press a while ago that would go down to 200RPM or so, a 5.5" HSS holesaw would still be pretty sketchy in aluminum, probably overheat and dull quickly in sheet steel even with loads of cutting oil. Now I just have a woodworking drill press because I moved and haven't run 220V to the garage for my mill, its slowest speed is around 550RPM which is sketchy for even 3" carbide tipped sheet metal cutters in cold rolled steel. If I don't set fire to the cutting-oil-soaked scrap wood backing up the steel it's a good cut.
 
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NerdAshes

Active Member
Jan 6, 2024
110
66
28
Eastside of Westside Washington
I had a metalwork drill press a while ago that would go down to 200RPM or so, a 5.5" HSS holesaw would still be pretty sketchy in aluminum, probably overheat and dull quickly in sheet steel even with loads of cutting oil. Now I just have a woodworking drill press because I moved and haven't run 220V to the garage for my mill, its slowest speed is around 550RPM which is sketchy for even 3" carbide tipped sheet metal cutters in cold rolled steel. If I don't set fire to the cutting-oil-soaked scrap wood backing up the steel it's a good cut.
Someone could use a plasma cutter too. I just figured by the time I calibrated the CNC I could have cut it out manually .. or even if you use the plasma cutter by hand - how fast to move? what's the circle template size? etc.
In the end - jigsaw won. Dirty, cheap, fast, ugly. If I was entering into a case mod contest - I probably would have would have started with an aluminum block and a CNC mill lol.
 

oharag

Member
Feb 18, 2024
95
26
18
Warning this is NSFW (Not Safe For Wallet)!

I'd buy a big hole saw and use the drill press for the fan hole (...or if you have a sexy mill, use that) - (... or 3d print). I did a much uglier jigsaw and vice method. The flow was;

  • Remove the bottom case (8 screws) and drill two specific (noted below) top existing holes, slightly bigger for the fan's mounting screws.
  • Use protection. Metal will be flying around now. The Jig Saw will be loud. E&E folks. (eyes & ears)
  • Mount the fan using the two slightly bigger holes and use a Markal Silver-Streak Holder with Reflective Lead (the lead insert is skinny enough to mark the holes through the fan holes), to mark the holes for rear and trace the fan opening. Don't pick your nose or rub yours eyes now.. it is a lead insert. Wash you hands, swap your gloves, whatever you need to do.
  • Drill the 2 rear holes and a bigger hole, near the edge of the fan opening trace line (for the jigsaw blade).
  • Mount the case top in a vice and use the jigsaw with a bi-metal cutting blade, to cut out the fan opening. Pro-tip attach a bit of wood (using the screw holes) that sticks out further than the case. Use the wood to grip with the vise - to not mar the paint of the case. At the very least, use something (cardboard/rubber/etc.) to keep the vise's jaws soft.
  • Paint the exposed steel (I used matte black Krylon Fusion) to prevent rust.
  • Attach the fan mount screws from the inside, to the fan mounted on the outside of the case.
  • Put the face-plate (falls off when you remove the bottom) and bottom, back on the case.


View attachment 35813
Remove these 8 screws to get to the top of case - from the inside.
View attachment 35814

Mounting the fan from the inside once you're done making the hole (don't forget to paint any exposed metal).
View attachment 35815

This is the hole to enlarge for your first mount.
View attachment 35816

Hole size I ended up with after cut-out.
View attachment 35817

Here is a 3-way of MS-01, all up in each others business. So hawt!
View attachment 35818

How loud is it with several switches and three MS-01 with 140mm fans? See below. This is 6" above the MS-01 (and mostly the switches).
View attachment 35819
That is all I've got - enjoy your 140mm blow job! ;-p
I have to say this is crazy - but adventurous on you part. You are pioneer.
 
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NerdAshes

Active Member
Jan 6, 2024
110
66
28
Eastside of Westside Washington
Haha you're right I must get my eyes checked.

BTW, did you ever remove that backside plastic bracket? I would love to know how easy or difficult it is.
I have not. I read a post where someone did. They mentioned that they broke a bunch of plastic rivets doing it. You can see a few of them if you look close at the top, inside. I had to flex the back plate to get the NIC in there. You can't see them in the pic - but the thin metal I have wedged in the pic - is where I can see them. They make the metal bend and I suspect play an important role in rigidity of the back plate's frame.

Install NIC to MS-01 (1).jpg

You should be able to do it - but you may end up 3d printing a new back or using some glue/tape to get it to stay on after.

... I just noticed you can see the imprint of the 140mm fan's screw mount in the foam of the CPU cooler. That's a tight fit!
 
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NerdAshes

Active Member
Jan 6, 2024
110
66
28
Eastside of Westside Washington
I have to say this is crazy - but adventurous on you part. You are pioneer.
Well I was past the return window and I'm not about to ship back to China for warranty work (I can fix anything they can), so why not? It's just a hole in metal and *poof* better cooling. The risk was low in my opinion. I'm probably the first to do it on a MS-01 though (since many are still waiting for theirs). So yeah! I am a pioneer! I'll take it. Thank you!
 

GreenAvacado

Active Member
Sep 25, 2022
176
80
28
I have not. I read a post where someone did. They mentioned that they broke a bunch of plastic rivets doing it. You can see a few of them if you look close at the top, inside. I had to flex the back plate to get the NIC in there. You can't see them in the pic - but the thin metal I have wedged in the pic - is where I can see them. They make the metal bend and I suspect play an important role in rigidity of the back plate's frame.

View attachment 35829

You should be able to do it - but you may end up 3d printing a new back or using some glue/tape to get it to stay on after.

... I just noticed you can see the imprint of the 140mm fan's screw mount in the foam of the CPU cooler. That's a tight fit!
Man, that looks the real pain in the ass.

Will push my luck anyway to remove that back plastic bracket, hopefully without breaking those retention clips. In my case, I need to remove the motherboard, first by taking out 4 mounting screws and then removing the plastic bracket to make room to tilt this slight wider PCI card into the slot.