ES Xeon Discussion

minimini

Member
Sep 9, 2016
62
14
8
51
So what happens with XMP memory and XMP settings then ? Totally useless on Xeons ?? So i am better off with some lower priced ECC memory than enthusiastic unbuffered one ...

Btw, is there any other difference between ASUS Z10PE-D8 WS and ASUS Z10PE-D16 WS - except number of memory and PCIe slots ??
 

RolloZ170

Well-Known Member
Apr 24, 2016
2,626
657
113
55
So what happens with XMP memory and XMP settings then ? Totally useless on Xeons ?? So i am better off with some lower priced ECC memory than enthusiastic unbuffered one ...
You need native Memory. No XMP.
i.e. i have Crucial Bal.tactical 2666mhz DDR4 DIMM's, those are native 2400mhz, it will be set to 2400 with BIOS settings to AUTO (if your cpu supports 2400)
ECC is only needed if you run a server 24h/365d without dayly reboot.
But RDIMM is required to get maximum memory amount.
 

RolloZ170

Well-Known Member
Apr 24, 2016
2,626
657
113
55
Got two nice E5-2629 v3 QFRV/QGP8 (QS) today.
i think the 2629 is a budget 2630 one, !! ATTENTION !! NO VMX support on those.
2629v3_QFRV_QGP8_cpu-z_all2600.gif 2629v3_QFRV_QGP8_cpu-z_bench.gif 2629v3_QFRV_QGP8_devicemanager.gif 2629v3_QFRV_QGP8_cinebenchR15.gif 2629v3_QFRV_QGP8_HWinfo_CPU.gif 2629v3_QFRV_QGP8_HWinfo_SUM_all2600.gif 2629v3_QFRV_QGP8_HWinfo_SUM_idle.gif 2629v3_QFRV_QGP8_HWinfo_SUM_mixed.gif
 
  • Like
Reactions: ewwink

ewwink

New Member
Sep 7, 2016
21
1
3
42
and depends on what u want to do with it.
Gaming needs high core clocks
rendering needs high multicore performance(high cinebench)
no gaming or rendering I just like high score for passmark or cinebench :D and want to spent $500 efficiently, but I do alot multi tasking in my work.
 

RolloZ170

Well-Known Member
Apr 24, 2016
2,626
657
113
55
no gaming or rendering I just like high score for passmark or cinebench :D and want to spent $500 efficiently, but I do alot multi tasking in my work.
maybe the E5-2686v3 QS QG7V $500 cinebench >=2000
u can get a E5-2683 v3 OEM for $400 cinebench >=1800
IMHO best price/performance is a E5-2658v3 ES QEYP for $150 cinebench >1300
 
  • Like
Reactions: ewwink

ewwink

New Member
Sep 7, 2016
21
1
3
42
I already have e5-2683v3 qey7, cinebench 1500. maybe I will try e5-2686v3. as usual you're very helpful, thank you RolloZ110.
 

J--

Active Member
Aug 13, 2016
197
47
28
39
What are you trying to accomplish other than benchmarking?

Swapping between similar CPUs doesn't get you much, maybe time to consider a dual CPU board?
 

TLN

Active Member
Feb 26, 2016
492
74
28
33
I personally thought that dual-cpu rigs is the only use of those xeons. What's the advantages of Xeon vs. i7 for regular user?
I mean, I know about ECC, quad-channel, and so on, but afaik, single i7 will be faster then single xeon in pretty much everything.

It would be really nice to hear what people are using their systems for. More and more people asking about Xeon for gaming, which is not-so-good choice.
 

Jann

New Member
Aug 8, 2016
7
0
1
37
I personally thought that dual-cpu rigs is the only use of those xeons. What's the advantages of Xeon vs. i7 for regular user?
I mean, I know about ECC, quad-channel, and so on, but afaik, single i7 will be faster then single xeon in pretty much everything.

It would be really nice to hear what people are using their systems for. More and more people asking about Xeon for gaming, which is not-so-good choice.
My reason for a Xeon is simple - the E5-2686V3 performs better/same as 8core i7 in 3d rendering, for a price of 6 core i7. I don't need to overclock it, so I can use a silent Noctua cooler, and overall hope to get a semi-silent system.
I'm also looking to try a few gpu renderers, so pciex lanes are important. All this is why I prefer Xeon. And 3.5GHz is enough for games.
 

Patrick

Administrator
Staff member
Dec 21, 2010
12,398
5,577
113
It would be really nice to hear what people are using their systems for. More and more people asking about Xeon for gaming, which is not-so-good choice.
Depends on the game right? You have really big games like World of Warcraft, League of Legends, DoTA and etc. that have huge player bases and run extremely well on Xeon cores/ speeds. Minecraft you do generally want single-threaded performance for servers but if you had a lower number of players you could easily run that in a E5 core VM.

Just as perspective, using the E5-2650 V3's I have Premiere Pro, Photoshop, Acrobat Pro, Dreamweaver Iometer, Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook, 5 RDP sessions, a 9 virtual machine Docker Swarm cluster in Hyper-V, three development Linux VMs, a MySQL server for some data sets we have, a primary Ubuntu desktop for Linux applications and another Ubuntu desktop VM I use for suspicious e-mail/ link opening. I also have a GTX 970 that I can play LoL on fine once every other week that even with everything else running still pushes well over 200fps in a 1920x1200 window.

The system is sub 28 dba, usually has around 16 SSDs attached, has 10GbE networking as well and drives a 4K display. 256GB RAM helps a lot.

The fact that I can have that much stuff running in a near silent system, even encoding video using PPro and still play a game that about 70 million people play per month (LoL) to me means it is pretty good for gaming. The CPUs are only 2.3GHz - 3.0GHz and 10 core/ 20 thread models. Not too bad at all. Now if you want to play first person shooter games, I can see wanting more clock speed and a better GPU.
 
  • Like
Reactions: socra and William

dunde

New Member
Aug 7, 2016
15
1
3
45
I personally thought that dual-cpu rigs is the only use of those xeons. What's the advantages of Xeon vs. i7 for regular user?
I mean, I know about ECC, quad-channel, and so on, but afaik, single i7 will be faster then single xeon in pretty much everything.

It would be really nice to hear what people are using their systems for. More and more people asking about Xeon for gaming, which is not-so-good choice.
Not many games ar held back by a V3 or V4 Xeon. What you need for gaming is a good GPU. AFAIK a quite low end CPU is good enough för most gaming, multi GPU and really high performing GPU:s make the most of a faster CPU.
 

TType85

Active Member
Dec 22, 2014
597
173
43
Garden Grove, CA
Not many games ar held back by a V3 or V4 Xeon. What you need for gaming is a good GPU. AFAIK a quite low end CPU is good enough för most gaming, multi GPU and really high performing GPU:s make the most of a faster CPU.
That chart is a bit out of date, the new wow expansion updated the graphics engine a bit.

Wow prefers a high speed cores but few of them. I was running on a VM on a e5-2676 v3 (12 core, up to 3ghz), 6 cores assigned to the VM and a GTX 970 video card. During the legion invasions (tons of people and enemies on the screen) one core was maxed out, gpu usage was low, under 50%. I would get 25-30FPS running at 2560x1440 settings on "7" which is the old Ultra settings. Faster video cards did not make it better. Running bare metal did not make it better.

I built a i5-6600K overclocked to 4.2ghz and was getting 55-70fps with the same GTX 970, display settings and legion invasions. GPU usage is now in the 80-95% range.

EDIT: Wow seems to run on pretty much anything but if you want the best experience it still needs a pretty stout computer.

Also take a look at this:


It really comes down to your what games you play or apps you run. If your software doesn't scale well faster with less cores may be better.
 

TLN

Active Member
Feb 26, 2016
492
74
28
33
Depends on the game right? You have really big games like World of Warcraft, League of Legends, DoTA and etc. that have huge player bases and run extremely well on Xeon cores/ speeds. Minecraft you do generally want single-threaded performance for servers but if you had a lower number of players you could easily run that in a E5 core VM.

Just as perspective, using the E5-2650 V3's I have Premiere Pro, Photoshop, Acrobat Pro, Dreamweaver Iometer, Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook, 5 RDP sessions, a 9 virtual machine Docker Swarm cluster in Hyper-V, three development Linux VMs, a MySQL server for some data sets we have, a primary Ubuntu desktop for Linux applications and another Ubuntu desktop VM I use for suspicious e-mail/ link opening. I also have a GTX 970 that I can play LoL on fine once every other week that even with everything else running still pushes well over 200fps in a 1920x1200 window.
I mean, i7 supports 32Gigs of memory - is that enough for WoW, or LoL?

I'm planning on AIO, so it will be 2-3 desktops, NAS, several VMs for development, and stillroom for experiments (cisco 1000V, ASAv, junuper, etc.) for my upcoming certifications. Oh, and I don't mind playing games from time to time.

GPU is the main thing for gaming. But for general use (i.e. no hypervisor) regular i7 will give better performance with same GPU. Or I'm wrong?
 

dunde

New Member
Aug 7, 2016
15
1
3
45
That chart is a bit out of date, the new wow expansion updated the graphics engine a bit.

Wow prefers a high speed cores but few of them. I was running on a VM on a e5-2676 v3 (12 core, up to 3ghz), 6 cores assigned to the VM and a GTX 970 video card. During the legion invasions (tons of people and enemies on the screen) one core was maxed out, gpu usage was low, under 50%. I would get 25-30FPS running at 2560x1440 settings on "7" which is the old Ultra settings. Faster video cards did not make it better. Running bare metal did not make it better.

I built a i5-6600K overclocked to 4.2ghz and was getting 55-70fps with the same GTX 970, display settings and legion invasions. GPU usage is now in the 80-95% range.

EDIT: Wow seems to run on pretty much anything but if you want the best experience it still needs a pretty stout computer.

Also take a look at this:


It really comes down to your what games you play or apps you run. If your software doesn't scale well faster with less cores may be better.
Well, it is the same with newer games.
Intel Haswell-EP Xeon 14 Core Review: E5-2695 V3 and E5-2697 V3
 

TLN

Active Member
Feb 26, 2016
492
74
28
33
I would agree with this as well. The E5-2670 price tracking topic was very helpful.
And the fact that you can throw: "I'm runnin dual CPU with 20+ cores and 64 gigs memory, YO!"




i7 4930k cost $300 new = 130fps. You get warranty and 100% comparability with all motherboards.
Would you buy Xeon E5-2695v3 for same money with no warranty, and possible issues?

ps. Interesting, that system with dual Xeon 2687 scored less then single CPU rig
 

helsyeah

Active Member
Aug 22, 2015
111
30
28
42
GPU is the main thing for gaming. But for general use (i.e. no hypervisor) regular i7 will give better performance with same GPU. Or I'm wrong?
We are a bit off-topic from ES discussion here, but here's one datapoint to consider:

Generally, a higher clockspeed I7 will be better for gaming, yes (especially as @TType85 illustrated with WOW, which appears to heavily CPU bound).

The question you have to answer is; do you build a gaming machine that you can do some VM/dev work on, or do you build a AIO mainly focused on hypervisor/VM/dev work, that you can occasionally game on? Its about priorities.

Personally, I built an AIO with a focus on the hypervisor/VM/NAS/dev first, and then built a gaming VM on that for very occasional gaming. I run the gaming VM to the living room with USB/GPU passthrough and it runs the games I play quite well at 1080 (I did just upgrade the video card to a RX 480 8GB). Take that for what its worth, but again, consider your primary use.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: TType85