E3-1500 v5 mobo for NAS choice

Which mobo is better for 8 Bay NAS

  • C236 WSI4-85L

    Votes: 1 50.0%
  • X11SSV-M4

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • X11SSV-M4F

    Votes: 1 50.0%

  • Total voters
    2

EluRex

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Apr 28, 2015
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Patrick

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Perhaps look at the E3-1200 V5 series. I think that is better matched for a NAS.
 

dicecca112

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Feb 10, 2016
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Another issue is memory cost. ECC DDR4 SODIMMs are almost double the cost of normal DIMMs
 

josh3light

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Jul 28, 2016
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I'm interested in checking out the E3 1500-v5 series for the GVT-d and GVT-g passthrough, but I haven't seen them in stock anywhere yet. Other than the previous servethehome article, I'm also interested in reading some more detailed information how GVT-d and -g is/will be implemented/supported in the common hypervisors. For VMWare, would Horizon be necessary or would it be possible to be utilized with a free esxi installation?

Any ETA when these will be on the market?
 

Patrick

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@josh3light my guess is that we will get a sample in the next two weeks. Retail availability not long after that.
 
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nk215

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Oct 6, 2015
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I'm interested in checking out the E3 1500-v5 series for the GVT-d and GVT-g passthrough, but I haven't seen them in stock anywhere yet. Other than the previous servethehome article, I'm also interested in reading some more detailed information how GVT-d and -g is/will be implemented/supported in the common hypervisors. For VMWare, would Horizon be necessary or would it be possible to be utilized with a free esxi installation?

Any ETA when these will be on the market?
I am afraid GVT-d/g is only available on open-source hypervisors (Xen/KVM). I hope I am wrong and ESXi gets on-board.
 

josh3light

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Jul 28, 2016
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Very interesting, do you have any link to that info? I was thinking of looking into Xen recently, this may be another good reason...

I am afraid GVT-d/g is only available on open-source hypervisors (Xen/KVM). I hope I am wrong and ESXi gets on-board.
 

archangel.dmitry

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Sep 11, 2015
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E3 is overkill for a NAS. Newer Atom and i3 are appropriate and cheaper. But, if you planning on switching to ESXi/XEN etc later, then E3 is a good place to start.
 

nk215

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Oct 6, 2015
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Very interesting, do you have any link to that info? I was thinking of looking into Xen recently, this may be another good reason...
Intel® Graphics Virtualization Technology (Intel® GVT) | 01.org

Here's a quote:

"As a long-standing member of the open source community, Intel works upstream to ensure that full, open source implementations of Intel® GVT exist for open source virtualization hypervisors, KVM* and Xen*, known respectively as KVMGT and XenGT"

It doesn't exclude ESXi so I still have some hope.
 
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fractal

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Jun 7, 2016
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E3 is overkill for a NAS. Newer Atom and i3 are appropriate and cheaper. But, if you planning on switching to ESXi/XEN etc later, then E3 is a good place to start.
Heck, even the pentium and G series support ECC memory making them a viable choice.

One issue is max memory. Older E3/i3/p/g series are limited to 32G, newer are limited to 64G. That could be an issue at 8 drives for some people.

Of course, all bets are off if you want to do more than serve files from the box.
 

josh3light

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Jul 28, 2016
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Aside from the 32 gb memory limitation, it does look interesting. However, online retailers appear to be pricing it at ~900 dollars, which seems like quite a premium for a 4 core embedded platform without 10gbE.

Looking forward to the power consumption and performance results.

@josh3light Supermicro X11SSV-M4 is now in the lab. I have to say I am extremely interested to see how it performs.
 

josh3light

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Jul 28, 2016
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In the Intel Ark for E3-1585V5, this entry shows up under "Graphics Video Max Memory"
----------------------------------------------------------------
Graphics Video Max Memory 64 GB
----------------------------------------------------------------

Then, am I correct in understanding that any gpu processing for Iris Pro uses the main system memory instead of dedicated graphics memory?
So as an alternative to having a 24GB quadro gpu, you would possibly have a "64GB Iris Pro" gpu? And gpu opencl calculations would now be limited by the entire system memory instead of being limited by dedicated GPU memory?

@josh3light it has a giant heatsink. Apparently the Iris Pro GPU can get very hot.

I think the reason you pay $900 (with a smile) is if you take advantage of GVT-g Intel Xeon E3-1500 V5 - Video and Virtualization CPUs Launched
 

Patrick

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I do not think it works quite like that on these chips.
 

gbeirn

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Jun 23, 2016
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Well technically it does. I have an Intel NUC with A Skylake i5 and Iris Pro graphics. The system RAM is the video RAM (shared between the two).

I have no way of testing something that large but I have 32GB in it and RAM is dynamically allocated for video as it is needed. I can observe this when playing games.

I think the larger problem would be that the actual processing power on the Intel graphics is far below Quadro GPUs so I can't imagine a usage where you would get remotely close to seeing that much usage before running out of processing power.

I'd be happy to test something on the NUC if you'd like: 1.8GHz HT dual core, 4MB L3, 64MB EDRAM, 32GB DDR4 2133.
 

josh3light

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Jul 28, 2016
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So, using the E3-1500 v5 for shared virtualization, you should be able to allocate fairly large amounts of video ram per VM, right?

Is this use case feasible (if am I understanding this correctly?):
In a 64gb ram system like the asrock:
- simultaneously run gpu accelerated VDI of a Linux VM and Windows VM
- allocate 32gb of system ram for each
- run 3d content creation applications in each which use a large amount of video ram, say 16gb.
- Within those content creation applications, any OpenCL processing functions would utilize the same gpu being used for the current display (this is how it works with a physical/dedicated Gpu).

If this wouldn't work, why not? what are the limitations?
 

gbeirn

Member
Jun 23, 2016
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So, using the E3-1500 v5 for shared virtualization, you should be able to allocate fairly large amounts of video ram per VM, right?

Is this use case feasible (if am I understanding this correctly?):
In a 64gb ram system like the asrock:
- simultaneously run gpu accelerated VDI of a Linux VM and Windows VM
- allocate 32gb of system ram for each
- run 3d content creation applications in each which use a large amount of video ram, say 16gb.
- Within those content creation applications, any OpenCL processing functions would utilize the same gpu being used for the current display (this is how it works with a physical/dedicated Gpu).

If this wouldn't work, why not? what are the limitations?
I would think this would work. If you have specifics I can test it for you with my i5.
 

josh3light

New Member
Jul 28, 2016
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I would think this would work. If you have specifics I can test it for you with my i5.
A way to check if opencl is properly running would be the MemtestCL utility from folding@home:
Download Utilities — Folding@home


It would be nice to know if , on the Iris pro, that utility runs without errors inside a virtual machine that's using GVT-g.
However, I'm not sure how to check the amount of memory available to the GPU or opencl without installing extra software.