$499 Raritan PX3-5930V 30A 208V Outlet metered/switched 0 U PDU

cookiesowns

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Feb 12, 2016
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A lot of people here I believe run colos or have 208V hookup. Especially for people that run dense clusters.
 

WeekendWarrior

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Apr 2, 2015
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How many people even have 208 2 phase power at their homes?
In the spirit of adding to the discussion but not disagreeing: most homes receive two phases and can generate 240V from the two phases. Homes with electric dryers probably use such circuits due to the power draw required.

Businesses also receive two or three phases but typically have a different way of transforming those phases into 2xx Volts (transformer winding configuration) and can typically generate 208V.

Most modern computer equipment and presumably this PDU can receive 208 and 240 equally well so the 208/240 subject is a distinction without a meaningful difference.

An additional wrinkle is that the L6-30P connector is a 30A connection for each of the two phases, and no home natively has that outlet. So, a visit from an electrician is needed but home use is possible.
 
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forroden

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Jan 1, 2017
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So, a visit from an electrician is needed but home use is possible.
For what it's worth it's really not all that complicated to swap over a North American standard dryer or oven NEMA 14-50 over to one of the locking 240V plugs like the L6-30. You just take the two hots and the ground for the locking plug and put the neutral away. (If I'm remembering that right, it's been a few years). Took all of 15 minutes and $60 in parts from your local electric supplier when I did it in the spare laundry room in the basement.

Of course with the rise of Electric Vehicles you can even just buy an adapter to handle it for about the same cost as the wall socket.

There's also splitters for EVs as well that allow you to keep the clothes dryer working while also providing a nice plug in for the car. Long as you don't try to do both at once they work out fairly well.
 

WeekendWarrior

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Apr 2, 2015
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For what it's worth it's really not all that complicated to swap over a North American standard dryer or oven NEMA 14-50 over to one of the locking 240V plugs like the L6-30. You just take the two hots and the ground for the locking plug and put the neutral away. (If I'm remembering that right, it's been a few years). Took all of 15 minutes and $60 in parts from your local electric supplier when I did it in the spare laundry room in the basement.
Agreed that outlet conversion is well within reach as described above.

Different people have different opinions on whether plug conversion is philosophically OK based on the existence of the resulting plug suggesting that more power is available than the breaker/wiring can supply (assuming the original circuit was not 30A, which it very likely was not). As long as someone makes an informed decision on that issue, and doesn't leave a surprise to the next resident, either answer is OK IMHO.

But, if someone wants to use the PDU for the full 30A/5KVA or wants to match the circuit to the plug, a new circuit is presumably needed which in my opinion should use an electrician. That was what I meant to say ...
 

Propaganda

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Dec 6, 2017
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I did a plug swap on a HPE 572206-001 PDU; then again I got that for 65 bucks and the switchable extensions for another 20. I got it with the intention of remotely controlling\monitoring some mining rigs.
 

cookiesowns

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Feb 12, 2016
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I once only had the option of procuring a 30A PDU in time... even though my circuits in the DC was 20A L6... Had to get some well specced pigtails but the DC didn't bat an eye. They did say though if I ever do trip the breaker, that's on me.
 

Fritz

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Apr 6, 2015
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You guys running a smelting furnace with these thing?