Trying to figure out basic account/computer based sharing. Help?

Discussion in 'NAS Systems and Networked Home and SMB Software' started by 6BQ5, Mar 8, 2020.

  1. 6BQ5

    6BQ5 New Member

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    I'm trying to configure file sharing in my home network and I am having problems establishing specific permissions for specific accounts. This isn't a mission critical application or anything. I just want to learn how to manage something like this.

    I have a Windows Server 2019 machine called BIG-OCEAN. On that machine I share three folders.

    F:\FISH
    F:\PLANTS
    F:\SAND

    I have three Windows 10 machines called FERRY, BARGE, and TUG-BOAT. Each machine has one user account. FERRY has TOM, BARGE has DICK, and TUG-BOAT has HARRY.

    I can right click on each of the three folders above and share them with "Everyone". All three of the users listed above can access the three folders from their machines. Reading, writing, etc all works great! The general access path is BIG-OCEAN\<folder name>.

    I want to change this so each user can only access one folder.

    FERRY\TOM can only access BIG-OCEAN\FISH.
    BARGE\DICK can only access BIG-OCEAN\PLANTS.
    TUG-BOAT\HARRY can only access BIG-OCEAN\SAND.

    I right-click on the folder name on the Windows 2019 Server machine, click on "Properties", and then click on "Sharing". In the "Advanced Sharing" block I click on "Advanced Sharing...". Going further I click on the "Permissions" button and then on "Add...". Finally, in this fourth window where I can select the users and groups to access this folder I click on "Locations...". All I can see is BIG-OCEAN. Why can I not see the other three Windows 10 machines? I can ping them by name from a PowerShell window and I can share files both ways with them when allowing access to "Everyone".

    I'm a beginner here so go gentle on me. :)

    Thanks!

    -=- Boris
     
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  2. i386

    i386 Well-Known Member

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    You are in a workgroup, Not a Domain. Your Server Looks only in its local Users and groups.
     
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  3. BoredSysadmin

    BoredSysadmin Active Member

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    In other words, since you already running Windows Server, all you need to do is to create an Active Directory Domain, create users and join windows machines to the domain (Windows 10 Pro or higher could be joined to Domain)
     
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  4. 6BQ5

    6BQ5 New Member

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    Thanks! I tried Google searching how to do this hoping I would find a step by step guide. Can you by chance point me to a well respected reference?

    -=- Boris
     
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  5. BoredSysadmin

    BoredSysadmin Active Member

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  6. 6BQ5

    6BQ5 New Member

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    Thanks! A few questions. :)

    Can this be accomplished through a GUI based tool?

    Do I have to use a static IP address?

    The instructions reference a DNS. I personally don't have a DNS. Do I need the DNS from my service provider?

    -=- Boris
     
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  7. BoredSysadmin

    BoredSysadmin Active Member

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    1. You could, but learning PowerShell is critical nowadays
    2. Yes, a private IP address is required. Just make one up, like 192.168.0.5 - depending on your network
    3. The domain controller will also be an internal DNS server. It's a windows server role.
     
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