Proper torque for Epyc 7551P in Supermicro H11SSL-I; what about heatsink?

AveryFreeman

consummate homelabber
Mar 17, 2017
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Hi,

So I've been having a hard time getting my first Epyc board to post. I don't have the proper torque wrench provided with the new AMD processors, so I was "winging it" with a regular torx screwdriver.

I was planning to go grab a precision torque screwdriver from a local hardware store so I can have it in my arsenal, the AMD ones are only available from China AFAICT and I don't want to wait another 3-5 weeks for one to get here. The problem is, I think this torque screwdriver I have access to only adjusts in increments of 10 - e.g. 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 inch lbs. I have yet to verify this in person, but that's what it looks like from the photos: Precision Torque Screwdriver Set, 22 Piece

If the required torque for the Epyc processor is 1.5 newton meters, my calculations show that it's equivalent to about 13.25 inch lbs. If that's the case, and the screwdriver can only do either 10 or 20 inch lbs, would it be better to do 10 inch lbs and give a tiny little tightening with a regular torx screwdriver? Does it really matter if it's a little looser than spec? Would 20 inch lbs be better?

I am really hoping to eliminate the torque spec from my list of things to troubleshoot, so I can see if it's other things that might be why it won't post

Also, what about the heatsink assembly on the processor, will torque on it make a difference? I basically just screwed it all the way down. It's a Noctua NH-U12S TR4-SP3. Is that something I should be using a torque wrench for tightening, as well? If so, what spec?

Thanks
 

RolloZ170

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Apr 24, 2016
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the processor need x pressure to have contact to the sockets plastics housing, from there more pressure is not required/helpfull and can bent the socket/PCB. at LGA3647 the additional pressure of the cooler does not exists.
i have had a SP3 motherboard and Epyc / Noctua TR4-SP3. i have used a 1.2Nm torque-scr.driver for the socket, but i feeled the end before the click of the torque-scr.driver. first i have fasten the cooler screws not much to test if i get a POST, later i screwed full down.
i have seen some guy that just pulled the EPyc is the socket with his hands to get a POST, with memory errors of course but it worked.
i doubt your problem is located here.
 
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AveryFreeman

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I have had a SP3 motherboard and Epyc / Noctua TR4-SP3. i have used a 1.2Nm torque-scr.driver for the socket, but i feeled the end before the click
So a little under 1.5nm is OK? Is less better than more? (that's what it sounds like)

first i have fasten the cooler screws not much to test if i get a POST, later i screwed full down.
This is helpful advice, thanks. Is it just me, or does the Epyc use a lot less thermal paste than most Intel CPUs?

i have seen some guy that just pulled the EPyc is the socket with his hands to get a POST, with memory errors of course but it worked.
So the dude had the board powered on and he was screwing with the processor? No heatsink? wtaf.

i doubt your problem is located here.
Why?
 

RolloZ170

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Apr 24, 2016
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So a little under 1.5nm is OK? Is less better than more? (that's what it sounds like)
the torque mentioned by the manufacturer is to prevent damage from the processor and socket.
they spec. not exactly 1.5Nm +-1% you know ? more will bent your processor and damage your socket.
Is it just me, or does the Epyc use a lot less thermal paste than most Intel CPUs?
its you.
"i doubt your problem is located here."
yours don't POST right ? if correct you have other issue than too much/too less torque.
 

AveryFreeman

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Mar 17, 2017
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the torque mentioned by the manufacturer is to prevent damage from the processor and socket.
they spec. not exactly 1.5Nm +-1% you know ? more will bent your processor and damage your socket.

its you.

"i doubt your problem is located here."
yours don't POST right ? if correct you have other issue than too much/too less torque.
I bought a torque screwdriver off Amazon, I've just been too busy with work and other projects to try it yet.


Thankfully, this one has a digital readout that will let me know the exact nm, so I should be able to eliminate the torque on both the CPU socket and the heatsink as a variable, and it will be a nice addition to my tools.

As soon as I get some other things off my plate, I'll be going back to the Epyc server to see if I can get it working.

I was surprised to learn it was so much harder to build than an Intel E5, though - I've built several of those and E3s over the last 7 years I've been a homelabber, and this is the first time I've ever encountered any problems like this.
 

hmw

Active Member
Apr 29, 2019
358
124
43
Hi,

So I've been having a hard time getting my first Epyc board to post. I don't have the proper torque wrench provided with the new AMD processors, so I was "winging it" with a regular torx screwdriver.

I was planning to go grab a precision torque screwdriver from a local hardware store so I can have it in my arsenal, the AMD ones are only available from China AFAICT and I don't want to wait another 3-5 weeks for one to get here. The problem is, I think this torque screwdriver I have access to only adjusts in increments of 10 - e.g. 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 inch lbs. I have yet to verify this in person, but that's what it looks like from the photos: Precision Torque Screwdriver Set, 22 Piece

If the required torque for the Epyc processor is 1.5 newton meters, my calculations show that it's equivalent to about 13.25 inch lbs. If that's the case, and the screwdriver can only do either 10 or 20 inch lbs, would it be better to do 10 inch lbs and give a tiny little tightening with a regular torx screwdriver? Does it really matter if it's a little looser than spec? Would 20 inch lbs be better?

I am really hoping to eliminate the torque spec from my list of things to troubleshoot, so I can see if it's other things that might be why it won't post

Also, what about the heatsink assembly on the processor, will torque on it make a difference? I basically just screwed it all the way down. It's a Noctua NH-U12S TR4-SP3. Is that something I should be using a torque wrench for tightening, as well? If so, what spec?

Thanks
The symptoms of under or over-tightening the socket are usually memory errors (i.e one memory channel disappears). But this is a lot more commonly caused by either an extra standoff shorting something below (my Norco RP-4308 had this issue) or then some raised area shorting something else out (my Rosewill L4500 had no standoffs but still shorted out). With the Rosewill I actually had to apply liquid electrical tape so that the motherboard would recognize all memory channels when inside the case

Anyways - something like this Torx Screwdriver for AMD Ryzen Threadripper Processor, Star Tool Only | eBay will do the job nicely, it's cheap (at $12) and probably gets to you faster than something from China
 

RolloZ170

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Apr 24, 2016
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LOL out of stock since 22 july 2022

us,eu,de,other

us
 

BoredSysadmin

Not affiliated with Maxell
Mar 2, 2019
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So I've been having a hard time getting my first Epyc board to post. I don't have the proper torque wrench provided with the new AMD processors, so I was "winging it" with a regular torx screwdriver.
For most projects, 3 ugga duggas should provide sufficient torque ;-)
 

RageBone

Active Member
Jul 11, 2017
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Well, i might be the heretic here, but i just do it by hand and never really had any problems.
The threads of the screw stop at a point that i think can be felt decently enough.
Did use the official torque wrench once or twice but i could not find any real difference in feeling between that my hand torquing.

What are the Post issues you are talking about?
How does the system behave?
Had a look at postcode snooping?
 
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bitbckt

will google compiler errors for scotch
Feb 22, 2022
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"ugga duggas" may be a cultural reference that doesn't translate well over the internet.
 

BoredSysadmin

Not affiliated with Maxell
Mar 2, 2019
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"ugga duggas" may be a cultural reference that doesn't translate well over the internet.
Translation for the uninitiated: "Ugga Dugga" is both a meme and similar to the sound an impact gun makes (basically a powered tool to help undo stubbornly (like from rust) nuts, among other things). In cars, there is often specific torque for specific parts. Experienced mechanics often know which torque settings must be closely followed and which are not critical. Youtube mechanic channels (like Vehcor), who are very good at their jobs, often ignore some less critical torque settings and tighten the bolts by feeling or by waiting for 3 "ugga-duggas" sounds that made my impact wrench.
My obscure jab was at OP asking about proper torque setting in a situation that (IMHO) doesn't require it.
 

bitbckt

will google compiler errors for scotch
Feb 22, 2022
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If it helps assuage any sort of anguish: I appreciated the obscure jab. ;)
 

neobenedict

Member
Oct 2, 2020
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Just grab one of the official torque tools from china and pay for express delivery if you are impatient. Yes it's a $15-50 investment, but it's better that than destroying multi thousands worth of motherboards/CPUs because you overtighten.


Even without express delivery this only took a week to arrive to the UK. Results may differ if you live elsewhere.
 

hmw

Active Member
Apr 29, 2019
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My obscure jab was at OP asking about proper torque setting in a situation that (IMHO) doesn't require it.
While the bigger 4U coolers like the Noctua or Supermicro PA0064AP4 make it difficult to overtighten - it's much easier to do so with 1U coolers and waterblocks. You're probably right in that sense - that the OP is installing a bigger Noctua and should be okay. However, a torque screwdriver is much cheaper than the cost of repairs for a damaged motherboard socket :)