NoSQL experiences anyone?

Biren78

Active Member
Jan 16, 2013
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Wnat to know if anyone has experience with couchbase, cassandra or others. We are building a web app with a lot of data. MySQL will likely work well if it does not scale much but if it does become popular we need a scalable architecture.

Since we are going to do learning, wanted to hear suggestions. Also would appreciate what everyone is using in terms as a hardware setup. <200GB of data total even if it got big in the next yr or 2 so SSD is given. Is noSQL like MySQL where high clock speeds are most important or are cores important?
 

dba

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Feb 20, 2012
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You mentioned <200GB of data, which is small enough to fit into RAM. Can you talk about what the data looks like (key-value pairs, rows and columns, XML, etc.) and how it will be accessed (aggregations versus joins versus single-record retrieves, reads versus inserts/updates, etc.)?

Wnat to know if anyone has experience with couchbase, cassandra or others. We are building a web app with a lot of data. MySQL will likely work well if it does not scale much but if it does become popular we need a scalable architecture.

Since we are going to do learning, wanted to hear suggestions. Also would appreciate what everyone is using in terms as a hardware setup. <200GB of data total even if it got big in the next yr or 2 so SSD is given. Is noSQL like MySQL where high clock speeds are most important or are cores important?
 

Biren78

Active Member
Jan 16, 2013
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Without going into too much secret sauce basically there will be master data tables then a lot of information generated for relationships stored by users. I was tasked with building the box for my friends who are developing. Just wanted to see if there is some huge limiter on one and if to size for cores or clock speed
 

Salami

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Oct 12, 2012
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The most important thing for databases is a lot of RAM. The importance of the number of cores is proportional to the number of concurrent users. 1 core can probably handle 50 to 100 concurrent users or more, depending on usage. Faster CPUs are always important, but Intel makes you pay a large premium for their fastest CPUs. AMD can make a lot of sense for database servers.
 

dba

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Feb 20, 2012
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I understand that you might not want to share too much. The downside is that I know so little about what you are trying to do that I can't share anything that you would find useful. Even the cores versus Mhz answer is "it depends".

Without going into too much secret sauce basically there will be master data tables then a lot of information generated for relationships stored by users. I was tasked with building the box for my friends who are developing. Just wanted to see if there is some huge limiter on one and if to size for cores or clock speed
 

Patrick

Administrator
Staff member
Dec 21, 2010
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Let me ask a different question (not meaning to thread-jack) - since I am working on a STH tool. Why have folks gone NoSQL v. MySQL. Seems like nirvana to move away from MySQL.

BTW - Couchbase looks really cool.
 

PigLover

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Jan 26, 2011
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Let me ask a different question (not meaning to thread-jack) - since I am working on a STH tool. Why have folks gone NoSQL v. MySQL. Seems like nirvana to move away from MySQL.

BTW - Couchbase looks really cool.
There are probably some technically valid reasons too, but the biggest reason has to do with the politics of Open Source Software, Oracle's acquisition of Sun Microsystems and general community hatred of Oracle (partially justified, partially hyped).
 

rnavarro

Active Member
Feb 14, 2013
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There are probably some technically valid reasons too, but the biggest reason has to do with the politics of Open Source Software, Oracle's acquisition of Sun Microsystems and general community hatred of Oracle (partially justified, partially hyped).
Percona and MariaDB are two excellent, drop-in alternatives for Oracle's MySQL. MariaDB is lead by MySQLs old lead developer too!

We use MariaDB at work with great success and zero issues. :)