Move Over M.2: 16TB M.3 SSDs for the 1PB per U Data Center

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Evan

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Jan 6, 2016
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So is M.3 hot swapable or not?
It is if in the right chassis, not on a card like we are talking about, normally they are in a 1u chassis with a tray sort of thing and latch like you would any other disk.
 

AdrianB

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Mar 3, 2017
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It's not "my explanation" it's the way of enterprise asset management and the general lifecycle of IT gear, leases, warranties, etc... these large companies rarely if ever sell their gear themselves too, there's an entire industry around this equipment.

So your explanation is "Never Attribute to Malice That Which Is Adequately Explained by Stupidity".

So you say that in many large companies the SSDs are bought or leased, then they are used during a definite time, e.g. 3 years, then they are scrapped, regardless whether they are worn out or not.

Then the availability of many little used SSDs is caused by the fact that someone responsible with their purchases was stupid enough to overprovision by buying more SSDs than actually needed.


Of course, you may be right, even in the majority of such cases.

However, it is not absurd to believe that not all such cases are due to incompetence, especially if, as you say, there is an entire industry around this equipment, so when someone buys too much gear, which will lose money for his company, then that uninspired decision will bring profits for others.
 

jerrytsao

ROME X DCPMM
Sep 11, 2016
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So your explanation is "Never Attribute to Malice That Which Is Adequately Explained by Stupidity".

So you say that in many large companies the SSDs are bought or leased, then they are used during a definite time, e.g. 3 years, then they are scrapped, regardless whether they are worn out or not.

Then the availability of many little used SSDs is caused by the fact that someone responsible with their purchases was stupid enough to overprovision by buying more SSDs than actually needed.


Of course, you may be right, even in the majority of such cases.

However, it is not absurd to believe that not all such cases are due to incompetence, especially if, as you say, there is an entire industry around this equipment, so when someone buys too much gear, which will lose money for his company, then that uninspired decision will bring profits for others.
I'm still not sure why this argument exists, as @T_Minus said it's lifecycle of tech equipment, every 3-5 years upgrading lead them came out cheap on eBay or many other sites, CPU, SSD, NIC or what have you, the rule applies all the time.
 
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T_Minus

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Feb 15, 2015
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@AdrianB no one but you is stating it's because of incompetence that new or near new parts end up on 2nd hand market.
 

kkisme

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Jul 30, 2015
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Why sell high-performance second-hand SSDs at low prices?

I think, part of the reason is that some people want to experience the latest SSD in order to experience the latest technology.

When he played, he felt redundant and selling them was a good choice.

After all, they are still very valuable. For example, if you buy a new car and want to change your car after one year, you will naturally choose to sell it.

Part of the reason is that some companies or individuals want to do certain projects, but the project needs this SSD. It was originally chosen for the project to buy the latest SSD at a high price. When the project is completed, selling the excess SSD is also a good choice for recycling costs. After all, its current value is still very high.
 

Analogue Blacksheep

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Sep 8, 2019
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Sorry for the thread necromancy (this is one of the few threads on this subject), but I've noticed while looking for a high capacity SSD, there are not a lot of M.3/NF1 drives available right now. They seem to be fading out. I've noticed the Samsung PM983 NF1 drives are on Scan, but they seem to be on pre-order, while on Span they are listed as end of life. You can still buy adapters though.

Did the M.3/NF1 platform kind of fade out?
 
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Cixelyn

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Nov 7, 2018
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It largely did. Some of the other next-gen form factors really are taking over.
Any sense of which form factor is shaping up to be the dominant next-gen one?

Supermicro has a few E1.s and E1.L chassis. HPE iirc has U.3 optional bays on the DL32X+ series.
 

Evan

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Jan 6, 2016
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Seeing a lot of 2.5” NVMe in servers, in storage arrays it’s a bit of variety.
I think 2.5” for a while yet since makes it easy to deploy spinning disks or SSD of SAS, SATA, or NVMe kind. (In a word flexible)