Looking to get into Dual LGA 2011

Discussion in 'Processors and Motherboards' started by Ari Gold, Aug 9, 2017.

?

What would be my best best?

  1. Buy a used workstation

  2. Buy a used server (motherboard)

  3. Buy a used workstation/ATX motherboard

  4. Other

Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. Ari Gold

    Ari Gold New Member

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    Hi everyone,

    First time poster here, but congrats on the great amount of info on these forums so far!

    I'm looking to get into a Dual LGA 2011 build (probably for dual E5-2670's).
    I need these to run W10 with graphics card (GTX 10 series) for botting games, NOT playing.

    What would be my best best?
    -Buy a used workstation (can get a ThinkStation D30 for €300 used with single 2640)
    -Buy a server motherboard (cheap options like DELL W6W6G C8220 or one from Bargain Hardware, but that doesnt have pcie?)
    -Buy a used workstation/ATX motherboard (ie Asus Z9PA-D8)

    I prefer a plug-and-play kinda solution with a regular chasis (small form factor if possible)
    But I don't mind buying power cable adapters either.


    Kind regards,
    Thomas
     
    #1
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2017
  2. Evan

    Evan Well-Known Member

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    If the workstation is small enough form factors for you I would be tempted to keep it simple and just to that and add/upgrade the CPU, just check comparability of everything you want to do.
    Server motherboards if your taking supermicro sure but if you taking HP, Dell, Cisco etc I think they are much more trouble than they are worth unless you simply want to build a server on the cheap but using all geniune oem parts.
     
    #2
    Ari Gold likes this.
  3. i386

    i386 Well-Known Member

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    Do you really need dual socket (40+ pcie lanes or 128+ gb ram)? Or is it just "do want"?
     
    #3
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  4. Evan

    Evan Well-Known Member

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    Haha never ask a logical question like that !
    I could never imagine in most home labs or servers anything beyond 8 or so cores in a single socket is needed. (Unless you 'need' more than 128gb ram)
     
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  5. Nanotech

    Nanotech Active Member

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    Considering his main usage is for gaming none of the poll choices aside from other make any sense. He doesn't need more cores or even anything more than a 7700K to be honest or a Ryzen R5 1600X.
     
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  6. Boddy

    Boddy Active Member

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    For games, would a higher Ghz be better than multicore like E5 2670 that has a 2.6 - 3.3 GHz CPU?
     
    #6
  7. Nanotech

    Nanotech Active Member

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    Depending on whether it is single-threaded or multi-threaded and at the resolutions one will be playing games on:

    Building a 32-Thread Xeon Monster PC for Less Than the Price of a Flagship Core i7

    The difference between a i7-6700K and a E5-2670 in games such as GTA 5 is quite considerable (33 less minimum frames, 35 less average frames). Sure going to a higher resolution such as 1440P or 2160P will make the difference less noticeable if playing cpu bound games or at 1080P the difference is most noticeable. Strictly for gaming in my opinion even a 8c/16t is not needed. a 4C/8T or a 6C/12T is more than sufficient in my opinion.
     
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  8. Boddy

    Boddy Active Member

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    Good point @Nanotech! That article is 9 mths old, so I imagine the newer CPUs would be more powerful.

    IMHO some of the newer Kaby Lake & Ryzen CPUs are not that expensive, when you factor cheaper motherboards and ram on the newer platforms.
     
    #8
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  9. Nanotech

    Nanotech Active Member

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    That's exactly it. Pair a R5 1600/1600X with say a B350 motherboard and a good 2x8Gb kit and it would be much cheaper and faster than a single socket LGA2011 running an E5-2670. Not to mention that the E5-2670 is based on Sandy Bridge-EP which is an architecture dating back all the way to Q4 2011 (or Q1 2012 for the -EP lineup). Plus if you have a Microcenter nearby they have Ryzen bundled discounts where you can save up to $100. That's an excellent deal. Then you also have the issue of E5-2670 prices being much higher than what they were , DDR3 being harder to find since the focus of production is on DDR4 in 2017 and the cost of the LGA2011 motherboard (single or dual socket).

    Here is the Microcenter link:

    Micro Center - Computers and Electronics

    Not exactly the $100 it used to be but still saving $30 on say a B350 motherboard is a nice discount.
     
    #9
  10. TType85

    TType85 Active Member

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    I vote for buying a used workstation. I would go single socket though. The E5-1650/1660 CPU's are still pretty stout and you can buy a whole system pretty cheap. I picked up a Lenovo S30 for $225. It came with a E5-1620V2, 32GB DDR3 ECC Ram, 2TB HDD, 2 quadro cards (not good ones) and a Windows 7 COA. I threw in a 256GB SSD and GTX 1060 I had and picked up a E5-1660 for $115. I can probably get $60-80 back for the E5-1620V2.

    Comparing the system to the Ryzen 7 1700 i had; day to day performance there was little difference seat of the pants feel. I run multiple VM's for development, do some video re-encoding and play some games. The Ryzen 7 was faster on the re-encoding to h265 due to the extra cores. The E5-1660 played WOW better (game is mostly single core). The VM's I couldn't tell much difference.
     
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  11. Nanotech

    Nanotech Active Member

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    I think it's more to do with the turbo and clock speed differences as the E5-1660 (3960X unlocked Xeon) can boost up to 3.9Ghz on 1-2 cores whereas the 1700 can do 3.7Ghz on presumably 1 or 2 cores so that's a 200mhz clock speed difference. I think if they were clock for clock without turbo they probably would provide similar wow results. But your right that a cheap 1650/1660 system can be obtained for cheap. However I wouldn't really expect those OEM motherboards to really be able to overclock which is a big minus in my opinion especially as the 1650 and 1660 overclock nicely. The other problem is that good X79 motherboards add to the cost if overclocking is needed.
     
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  12. Ari Gold

    Ari Gold New Member

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    Nevermind the gaming, it will be used for botting around 90% of the time.
    I just put the gaming in there because it'll have to work with recent GPU's. (Botting computer games)
    I'll game/do single core stuff on my 6700 itx system I suppose.
     
    #12
  13. TType85

    TType85 Active Member

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    The 200mhz extra can be the difference, some games LOVE higher frequency chips. Comparing the E5-1660 to Ryzen they are pretty comparable. OC the Ryzen to 3.9Ghz and I would expect it to preform a bit better. Ram capacity and ram price are better on the E5-1660 side but motherboard cost on the Ryzen side is better. Good X79 boards go for insane prices. You can pretty easily load up a workstation with 128GB of ram using 16GB sticks, the DDR4 side that you are looking at near $600 just to hit 64GB.

    That said, Dual LGA2011 for most uses is not the way to go especially if it is your main workstation unless you have a specific workload that scales well to 2P. Higher speed single proc system is the way to go. There are a lot of articles and videos out there of people who jumped on the dual E5-2670 band wagon only to find the system was slower than they expected. If you are using it for non-production critical VM's you would be surprised how many VM's can run concurrently at acceptable speeds on a 6-8 core machine assuming you the disk sub-system to keep up.
     
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  14. cactus

    cactus Moderator

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    FYI I had to start Steam with affinity settings to even get GTAV running on my dual 2670. I could then never get games, in general, to run smoothly either. If you want to do gaming, stick to single socket.
     
    #14
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  15. Ari Gold

    Ari Gold New Member

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    I feel like opening a new thread, this got all about gaming so fast.....
     
    #15
  16. Nanotech

    Nanotech Active Member

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    GTA V also has that issue above certain core counts where it requires affinity settings to be configured otherwise it will crash.
     
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  17. cheezehead

    cheezehead Active Member

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    When looking at botting boxes specifically, how many instances are you planning on running? If your planning on running many instances, then the extra umph from the dual proc setups can be seen. If your planning on only running <4 instances though, single ryzen setup might be cheaper up front and cheaper on the electric bill.
     
    #17
  18. Ari Gold

    Ari Gold New Member

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    I will probably be able to run enough to max them.
     
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  19. rampage666

    rampage666 Member

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    I would say, avoid Intel motherboards, they tend to have more problems, support less CPUs (not supporting OEM, ES, QS cpus).
     
    #19
  20. Nanotech

    Nanotech Active Member

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    #20
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