Guide: 1356/1366 Xeon Aftermarket Heatsink Selection/Installation

T_Minus

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Yea Frostytech is great! According to benchmarks I've found that these CPU coolers to be the best at cooling and that should fit in a 4U server case (if you can find them and if they are worth the extra couple degrees):
-Tuniq Tower 120 Extreme Rev 1
-Scythe Katana 4
-Thermaltake Contac 21 (Similar to the CM TX-3 and also allows adding a 2nd fan)
-Coolermaster TX-3 (similar to the 212+ and Evo but smaller and cheaper, uses a 92mm PWM fan, and allows for a 2nd fan, but does not work for Socket 1366)
-Raijentek Aidos (similar to the CM TX-3 and Contac 21 but cannot add a 2nd fan)
-Xigmatek Loki SD963
-Silenx EFZ-92HA3
-Iceage 120 Prima Boss or Iceage 120 Plus

I've done a lot of looking, but just ended up getting the Supermicro SNK-P0040AP4 heatsinks as I was able to get a bunch of them for pretty cheap off ebay and I knew that they would be compatible with my server motherboards. If I'd do it again, I'd probably get the Coolermaster TX-3 or the Thermaltake Contac 21 so I could add 2 fans to it and hope that I could mod the mounting bracket like you @chinesestunna did.

Oh and @Marsh how do those Intel E97381 heatsinks work as far as cooling? Do they keep things pretty cool? I know these are servers so they can run pretty hot, but I like to keep things as cool as possible including the motherboard and components. It's probably from building mainly office/gaming pc's. Thanks!
Why would you replace the SM 4U Active cooler with a Cooler Master Hyper TX3? They're practically identical, neither use a copper base.
 

TubaMT

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Why would you replace the SM 4U Active cooler with a Cooler Master Hyper TX3? They're practically identical, neither use a copper base.
It would only be if I wanted to add a second fan to the configuration to create a push/pull set up on the CPU cooler. I may be able to do this with the Supermicro heatsinks though. Coming from an overclocking/gaming setup on air, it's hard to see CPU's in the 60's-70's for me. I'm used to seeing them in the 40's-50's even though I know Intel CPU's can run safely in the 70's or higher usually. I have not received the Supermicro heatsinks yet though so I'm hoping that it will bring temps down as low as possible :)

And @Marsh you are awesome! If it's not too much trouble could you do a quick test on the L5520 series processors? If it's too much trouble or takes too much time though do not worry about it :)

And so, cpu coolers that are Socket 1366 compatible are also compatible with socket 1356. Are 1366 socket cpu coolers that have screws like the Supermicro SNK-P0040AP4 or the Intel E97381-001 heatsinks compatible with Socket 2011 as well?

According to this chart: Super Micro Computer, Inc. | Support they are not, but I've read that Socket 2011 and 1366 have the same spacing between holes for mounting heatsinks and both use the screw-type backplate (if you have a server 1366 mobo, which most of us do). Thanks all!
 

T_Minus

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That makes sense.

FWIW: I have 2 heatsinks coming for 1366 I plan to test out on x5650s and x5680s to compare if there is a noticeable difference. I'll note the differences currently for baseline.
 

Marsh

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@TubaMT

System Manufacturer: Intel Corporation , System Model: S5500BC
6 x 4 gb memory
1 SSD only
Dual L5520 cpu
Intel E97381 cooler
Hwmonitor version 1.25

Windows 2012R2 15 min idle , 26 C and 28 C
Prime95 45 minute stress test , 47 C and 49 C

LGA 2011 cooler will not fit LGA1356 / LGA1366 , unless it is universal type .
 
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chinesestunna

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Jan 23, 2015
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@TubaMT

System Manufacturer: Intel Corporation , System Model: S5500BC
6 x 4 gb memory
1 SSD only
Dual L5520 cpu
Intel E97381 cooler
Hwmonitor version 1.25

Windows 2012R2 15 min idle , 26 C and 28 C
Prime95 45 minute stress test , 47 C and 49 C

LGA 2011 cooler will not fit LGA1356 / LGA1366 , unless it is universal type .
Thanks for providing that insight! How were the fan speeds/noise levels during Prime95? I'm guessing it's still very low since we're no where near the TCase for those CPUs

@TubaMT I would say that's one reason to consider aftermarket as well is being able to move the cooler investment to a newer platform. When we're looking at $30-80 per CPU, $20-30 per cooler suddenly changes the cost factors considerably :)
 
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Marsh

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When we're looking at $30-80 per CPU, $20-30 per cooler suddenly changes the cost factors considerably :)
You got the idea.
When I bench test new cpu or system board. I used a hack up Intel LGA775 ( old small cooler) , the heatsink just rest of top of the CPU, not screw it down, fire it up, , run Prime95 overnight. I did it this way couple hundred times.

My philosophy is not to cool the CPU and system board to the lowest possible temperature. Just cool enough for it to work.

I'll feel differently if the CPU cost $1000 or higher, for $20 cpu, I am pretty sure that I'll get bore with the CPU before it died.
 

chinesestunna

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You got the idea.
When I bench test new cpu or system board. I used a hack up Intel LGA775 ( old small cooler) , the heatsink just rest of top of the CPU, not screw it down, fire it up, , run Prime95 overnight. I did it this way couple hundred times.

My philosophy is not to cool the CPU and system board to the lowest possible temperature. Just cool enough for it to work.

I'll feel differently if the CPU cost $1000 or higher, for $20 cpu, I am pretty sure that I'll get bore with the CPU before it died.
Completely agree - I bench tested my 2 CPUs with the 212+ sitting directly on top with thermal paste as well. It's dangerous if you knock it over of course :)
I'm the same way in terms of cooling for stock systems, in fact Puget Systems did an excellent article on heat vs. performance for Haswell chips: Impact of Temperature on Intel CPU Performance - Puget Custom Computers
Even with the chip sitting above 99C it performed great, of course longevity is another issue at those temps. I'm comfortable with anything under 80C long term, as long as it's stable
 

T_Minus

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You got the idea.
When I bench test new cpu or system board. I used a hack up Intel LGA775 ( old small cooler) , the heatsink just rest of top of the CPU, not screw it down, fire it up, , run Prime95 overnight. I did it this way couple hundred times.

My philosophy is not to cool the CPU and system board to the lowest possible temperature. Just cool enough for it to work.

I'll feel differently if the CPU cost $1000 or higher, for $20 cpu, I am pretty sure that I'll get bore with the CPU before it died.
I agree, they don't need to be OMG COOL, like over clockers think for desktop. SPend $ and time elsewhere as long as you are within safe limits.
My only goal is to make it ABLE to run 100% w/out shutdown, which technically is the worst that can happen to modern INTEL CPUs unless you OC/change voltage, change the shutdown temp, etc..
 

chinesestunna

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I agree, they don't need to be OMG COOL, like over clockers think for desktop. SPend $ and time elsewhere as long as you are within safe limits.
My only goal is to make it ABLE to run 100% w/out shutdown, which technically is the worst that can happen to modern INTEL CPUs unless you OC/change voltage, change the shutdown temp, etc..
I gotta say, I'm one of those old school overclockers that started back in PII and Celeron days for cheap performance gains. As chips got hotter, heatsink solutions got fancier and more costly and I think the original "bang for buck" becomes lost for many these days.
If a $20 cooler gets me 30% more OC on a $200 than stock Intel and lower noise, yep worth it. But people shelling out $60-100 on air coolers that are a few C better and maybe gets them 5% on top of the $20 cooler eludes me
 
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T_Minus

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I agree. Only reason to spend the $ IMHO is to 1. cool for OC because you NEED it, or 2. to cool for silence because you LOVE it ;)

I cool for silence, even when I OC'd a couple years ago I put GOOD fans in there... it adds up.

$100 AIO Water Cooler
$100 for 4 NOCTUA Fans

$200 = a HUGE STEP UP in CPU purchase if you're just doing it for the OC!!

That's like going from a 4 core to a 6 core in price. No CPU cooler does that :D
 

chinesestunna

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I agree. Only reason to spend the $ IMHO is to 1. cool for OC because you NEED it, or 2. to cool for silence because you LOVE it ;)

I cool for silence, even when I OC'd a couple years ago I put GOOD fans in there... it adds up.

$100 AIO Water Cooler
$100 for 4 NOCTUA Fans

$200 = a HUGE STEP UP in CPU purchase if you're just doing it for the OC!!

That's like going from a 4 core to a 6 core in price. No CPU cooler does that :D
Haha I think it's a phase we all have to gone through and hindsight is 20/20. Back when I started in late 90s I built a fully custom watercooling loop, including waterblock from regular handtools and materials bought at Home Depot, well and 2 transmission radiators pulled off from junk yard Subarus. You should see the strange looks of the store associates gave when I tried to ask questions about plumbing fitting in order to "pump water into his PC". Back then there were like 2 companies that even made waterblocks, Swiftech and DangerDen.
I probably spent $250-300 in parts/materials and countless hours iterating the design until finally getting it to not leak and cool well, I even added 2 Peltier TEC units and chilled the PII I had down to -40C full load, condensation was a problem I couldn't fully fix...
Looking back I'm glad I did it and learned a lot from the experience, but all that cost and effort got me another 25Mhz vs. air in the end and eventually I moved back to air as it was just safer and easier for daily drivers.
 

applepi

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I've had really good luck with the NH-U12DX they are a bit expensive but at 7v I can't hear them at all and I have it cooling my server literally 5 feet from my bed. It keeps both of my X5675s at less that 50C load and 23c idle. Now to get rid of this damn coil whine coming from the C6100 sled or PSU can't figure out which.
 

chinesestunna

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I've had really good luck with the NH-U12DX they are a bit expensive but at 7v I can't hear them at all and I have it cooling my server literally 5 feet from my bed. It keeps both of my X5675s at less that 50C load and 23c idle. Now to get rid of this damn coil whine coming from the C6100 sled or PSU can't figure out which.
Are you running 7v with PWM or just constant? Those are great temps for 95w chips
 

applepi

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@chinesestunna It's connected directly to the 12V rail with a fan speed reducer to get to 7v or each fan.

@T_Minus The NH-U9DXi4 is a great 2-3U heatsink, for when you can't fit the U12DX. Just keep in mind smaller fans are generally louder and the heat sink has quite a bit less thermal mass.
 

T_Minus

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@chinesestunna It's connected directly to the 12V rail with a fan speed reducer to get to 7v or each fan.

@T_Minus The NH-U9DXi4 is a great 2-3U heatsink, for when you can't fit the U12DX. Just keep in mind smaller fans are generally louder and the heat sink has quite a bit less thermal mass.
I would be interested to know the difference between the 92mm and 120mm because it's a slightly larger HSF combo and that's about it.
92mm seems to cool EVERYTHING else I throw at it just fine, and SILENT (gotta love PWM). We'll see :)
 

chinesestunna

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I would be interested to know the difference between the 92mm and 120mm because it's a slightly larger HSF combo and that's about it.
92mm seems to cool EVERYTHING else I throw at it just fine, and SILENT (gotta love PWM). We'll see :)
Personally I'd go with the smaller one like you since it cools most things just fine (most of our systems sit at idle) and can fit into smaller cases. I have a few coolers which were great but can't go into something like an HTPC and forced me to look elsewhere
 

T_Minus

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yeah, the SM 4u aren't that loud imho, i jut want to compare since were within $20 :)
 

TubaMT

Member
Jul 26, 2014
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@TubaMT

System Manufacturer: Intel Corporation , System Model: S5500BC
6 x 4 gb memory
1 SSD only
Dual L5520 cpu
Intel E97381 cooler
Hwmonitor version 1.25

Windows 2012R2 15 min idle , 26 C and 28 C
Prime95 45 minute stress test , 47 C and 49 C

LGA 2011 cooler will not fit LGA1356 / LGA1366 , unless it is universal type .
Thank you SO much for the info! Those Intel coolers do a pretty great job! And thanks for the info on the LGA 1356/1366 and 2011 coolers. I figured that they would because I though they were all spaced the same, but better to know now then buy something that will not work :/


Thanks for providing that insight! How were the fan speeds/noise levels during Prime95? I'm guessing it's still very low since we're no where near the TCase for those CPUs

@TubaMT I would say that's one reason to consider aftermarket as well is being able to move the cooler investment to a newer platform. When we're looking at $30-80 per CPU, $20-30 per cooler suddenly changes the cost factors considerably :)
I can't believe I didn't even consider that! Makes total sense though to buy an aftermarket cooler so that you can adjust it to different sockets as you upgrade or change mobo's. Much better to just use an old cooler with new thermal paste and maybe a new fan then to have to buy another cooler plus CPU combo. Dang, makes me want to return my Supermicro 4U heatsinks and get some after market coolers so I can reuse them down the road. Thanks for the tip!