Choosing the right UPS to a server

zecas

New Member
Dec 6, 2019
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Hi,

I currently have the following server hardware, for which I'm searching for an UPS:

SuperStorage 6027R-E1R12T
Motherboard Supermicro X9DRH-7TF
2x Intel Xeon E5-2630V2
128Gb ECC RAM (8x Samsung 16GB 2Rx4 DDR3 1600MHz PC3-12800R ECC RDIMM RAM REG M393B2G70BH0-CK0)
LSI SAS 9207-8i KIT 8-Port 6Gbps SATA+SAS PCI-E 3.0 HBA
2x Samsung 860EVO SSD 250Gb
6x HGST HUC109060CSS600, 600GB 10K SAS 2.5" HDD
2x Supermicro 920W high-efficiency (94%+) Server Redundant PSU PWS-920P-SQ (80 plus platinum)

I've connected the system to a wattemeter and conducted parallel disk tests on all HDD drives, and got the following readings:

power off:
- 1PSU connected pulled 12.5W
- 2PSU connected pulled 15.5W

power on (boot up) with 2PSU:
- system pulled 180W
- it had a single peak at 226W
- stabilized at 185W waiting for boot device

power on, OS loaded, all disks under test:
- IPMI system registered no more than 180W during tests (several days testing disks)

So at this time, it seems that I can assume the system pulls around 200W maximum during heavy load?

What I want to connect to the UPS:
- Above server (let's say 200W);
- TP-Link 16port Managed Switch (registered 8W on wattemeter but specs say 15W max);
- Raspberry Pi 4 (let's say 10W).

So I'm looking for a total of 225W, or 250W if I want to be on the safe side.

It would be great to get an UPS that can keep the system running for let's say 20minutes, and in case the time remaining drops to say 7minutes, the raspberry pi would issue a shutdown command to the server (running proxmox) for a proper shutdown.

I was looking into the following 1500VA/1000W UPS:
CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD (PFC Sinewave UPS Series)

Would this UPS be enough to keep the system running for at least the time I was looking for?

Any opinions are welcome, I want to learn and be more assertive on the UPS choice.


Thank you.
 

T_Minus

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Feb 15, 2015
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Yes and no. You'll get that the first few times it cycles maybe more maybe less depending on how old the batteries are the first time they're needed. As they age and you discharge\charge them when needed they'll provide less and less. I have around 6 UPS and rely on them at least a dozen times if not 2dz per-year for power outages... sometimes I catch it quick and go on generator other times they drain then power-off my devices. My APC units seem to last until I notice less run time 5-6 years but the brand you linked to I only have 2 of those and they're not really in-use like my others so I don't have much feedback on them.

For my desktop I do have the extended\add-on battery so I can work a bit more and not worry about running to get generator going, I'm on year 7 Jan 2022 for my desktop setup and need to replace the batteries. I still get about 10-15 minutes run time BUT I used to get over an hour this year (around year 6) I started to notice as it was powering down before I was expecting and has gotten worse very quick... then again this year we've had a lot more outages before fall\winter has started so I've put it through another 2 winter seasons basically which historically have been when mine are used.

I would buy a device you can optionally add-on an extra power bank in case you need more run time.
 

zecas

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Dec 6, 2019
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First of all, thank you both for your replies.

There's never a simple and straight answer for this subject, isn't it :)

That CyberPower chart comes handy, adding another UPS of 2200 just for comparison basically doubles the amount of time, but the price difference is also on the double :eek:

I'm basically facing let's say 10-15 power outages a year, when it happens I can deal with stop working, but I can't risk data corruption or hardware failure due to those outages. I'm worried that spending 350€ on a CyberPower 1500VA will give me 25mins now, and in 2-3 years it drops so much that it just stops being of any use.

While checking for the solution, I'll also take a look on some 2200VA, maybe an APC 2200VA refurbished (I could buy new batteries), but it's a risk move, hoping the unit is working well.
 

Spearfoot

Active Member
Apr 22, 2015
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Regarding the CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD model... I just ordered an APC Back UPS Pro BX1500M to replace mine.

The CyberPower unit just turned itself off this morning -- out of the blue! -- along with all of the equipment connected to it! Same thing happened a couple of weeks ago. Our power didn't go out; the batteries are fully charged; and at 18% it's not overloaded.

Arbitrarily and capriciously turning itself off is unacceptable behavior from a UPS. :mad:
 
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Patrick

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Dec 21, 2010
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Regarding the CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD model... I just ordered an APC Back UPS Pro BX1500M to replace mine.

The CyberPower unit just turned itself off this morning -- out of the blue! -- along with all of the equipment connected to it! Same thing happened a couple of weeks ago. Our power didn't go out; the batteries are fully charged; and at 18% it's not overloaded.

Arbitrarily and capriciously turning itself off is unacceptable behavior from a UPS. :mad:
I have seen that on a few of those CyberPower units now. The new house is all APC, but Eaton just sent a UPS to review so I am curious to see how that works.
 
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l7777

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I have a number of APC units from 650 to 2200va in service. Most are Smart UPS units purchased from ebay. The newer smtxxxx units do pretty well on battery lifetime as my usage is primarily for quick outages. The only time the units seem to have an issue is when a battery dies. Things are usually ungracefully killed when the self test engages and the voltage suddenly drops from 100% to the cutoff for the ups. This isn't really the ups fault though and the solution to this is of course replace the batteries before they get to that point. Something to keep in mind, as you go up in VA from 1500 to 2200 and beyond you don't gain a lot of runtime as the batteries are wired in series to provide the extra VA at the cost of runtime. For example 750 to 1500 VA units use two 12v batteries wired in series for 24 operating volts. The 2200 uses four 12v batteries in series for 48 volts but will only provide a little more runtime. I use the 2200 VA units for my av equipment as it can pull a high but short wattage at times. My computer gear is primarily 1500va gear as I use about 300 watts or less most of the time. If you REALLY want runtime you could theoretically get a couple of 100 AH trolling motor batteries, wire them in series and connect them to a 1500 VA unit. Should easily get you an hour or two at your wattage. I think the standard batteries are 12 AH
 

T_Minus

Build. Break. Fix. Repeat
Feb 15, 2015
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Regarding the CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD model... I just ordered an APC Back UPS Pro BX1500M to replace mine.

The CyberPower unit just turned itself off this morning -- out of the blue! -- along with all of the equipment connected to it! Same thing happened a couple of weeks ago. Our power didn't go out; the batteries are fully charged; and at 18% it's not overloaded.

Arbitrarily and capriciously turning itself off is unacceptable behavior from a UPS. :mad:
That's the unit I use for my desktop + the extended runtime external battery pack add-on.
No complaints, and almost 7 years of same batteries and I needed it today again... I got almost 30min before it went out, and showed 90min left to 0 instantly and powered off my PC, and then had 10min left.. batteries are toast but wow 7 years and still 30min I'm still happy with it :)