AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO 3975WX $858USD New

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Marsh

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May 12, 2013
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New Ebay seller
Stock photo , not actual CPU

Negative
 

Propaganda

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Dec 6, 2017
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There have been a number of threadripper scam listings on ebay over the last few weeks.
 

Jacoub2490

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Apr 23, 2021
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Thanks for the feedback
The real question is, if customer ll pay using paypal & the seller is fake hence no delivery, Transaction will be voided & payment will be reversed. So what is the idea behind these kind of scams other than disturbing the customer & the entire payments system!!!
 
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alex_stief

Well-Known Member
May 31, 2016
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One way would be: after the deal fell through on paypal, you are contacted by the seller, urging you use another payment method because there has been a "mixup". Not many people fall for something so obvious, but those scammers are playing a numbers game. Try it with 1000 people, and you will find a handful of customers.
 
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bayleyw

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Jan 8, 2014
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Thanks for the feedback
The real question is, if customer ll pay using paypal & the seller is fake hence no delivery, Transaction will be voided & payment will be reversed. So what is the idea behind these kind of scams other than disturbing the customer & the entire payments system!!!
The straightforward scam is to ship a random $1 item to a random address sharing a ZIP code with the buyer's address. Tracking will show the item as delivered, but the buyer will mostly likely click 'item not received'. I am not sure what current PayPal policy is, but in the past, INR cases on items with valid tracking automatically resolve in the seller's favor and block you from opening a 'significantly not as described' case. Most US-based scammers are not so brazen as to commit outright mail fraud for a small chance at money (they often ask you to complete the transaction off eBay, then send you an invoice that links to a phishing site) but overseas sellers are much more ballsy at this kind of stuff.

I think the solution is to pay directly via credit card for items you don't trust, as of recently CC payments are processed by some merchant bank which is not PayPal. That way you can open a chargeback with your card issuer when the item inevitably doesn't arrive, and bypass PayPal's convoluted rules altogether.