AMD making a fool of Threadripper customers - AGAIN?

Patriot

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Apr 18, 2011
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Yes, I noticed. I was hoping more people would come back to this discussion... now that we have something to actually discuss.
So long as we can steer clear of delusions of personal persecution ... sigh

gotta allocate them limited wafers alright :^)
I really expected a 3dcache version of threadripper after all the delays. I guess frontier is eating up a lot of wafers.
There is no telling if they will stay true and release a zen3 threadripper, it's just a matter of if/when they do, will it matter anymore.

Given they are releasing Zen2 chips for AM4 this month....and unlocking all AM4 for Zen3.
 

Wasmachineman_NL

Dell Precisions FTW!
Aug 7, 2019
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So long as we can steer clear of delusions of personal persecution ... sigh


I really expected a 3dcache version of threadripper after all the delays. I guess frontier is eating up a lot of wafers.
There is no telling if they will stay true and release a zen3 threadripper, it's just a matter of if/when they do, will it matter anymore.

Given they are releasing Zen2 chips for AM4 this month....and unlocking all AM4 for Zen3.
Zen 3 on X370 boards is a interesting one, I still have a C6H monoblock spare... *looks up if it's compatible with the C6E*

EDIT: it is. Cool, shame the C6E is EATX though.
 
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Andrew_Carr

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Mar 18, 2022
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This might come off as seriously uninformed, but aside from using non-ECC RAM what's the big selling point of threadripper vs epyc? Easier overclocking, higher core clock speeds, lower price, and (maybe) cheaper motherboards also seem to be the selling points. But by that token, with a little bit of tinkering couldn't you build a dual-CPU epyc system using last gen processors, overclock them, and use low-density / high speed 3200MHz ECC RAM? Then RAM costs aren't obscenely different, processors are actually cheaper, overclocking becomes more difficult but still possible, and although you might spend a little more on a motherboard you also get two chips instead of one and all the extra features of a server board. What are these workstation workloads, do they require high core speed primarily while core count is useful but not as important? I dunno, I just look at threadripper and although it offers a price savings compared to high-end, brand new EPYC builds it doesn't seem anywhere near as affordable as tweaking some older epycs, especially if power efficiency isn't as large of a concern.
 

Patriot

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Apr 18, 2011
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This might come off as seriously uninformed, but aside from using non-ECC RAM what's the big selling point of threadripper vs epyc? Easier overclocking, higher core clock speeds, lower price, and (maybe) cheaper motherboards also seem to be the selling points. But by that token, with a little bit of tinkering couldn't you build a dual-CPU epyc system using last gen processors, overclock them, and use low-density / high speed 3200MHz ECC RAM? Then RAM costs aren't obscenely different, processors are actually cheaper, overclocking becomes more difficult but still possible, and although you might spend a little more on a motherboard you also get two chips instead of one and all the extra features of a server board. What are these workstation workloads, do they require high core speed primarily while core count is useful but not as important? I dunno, I just look at threadripper and although it offers a price savings compared to high-end, brand new EPYC builds it doesn't seem anywhere near as affordable as tweaking some older epycs, especially if power efficiency isn't as large of a concern.
Using server as workstation is kinda rough. Lack the IO options.
Threadripper pro is non overclockable, Threadripper is, and has much higher non-ecc clocked ram options for lower latency application requirements.

The problem isn't a change of priorities or a limitation of resources it is communication and clarity. Right now we don't know if there will ever be Zen3 on TRX40. There could be, it could be canceled, impossible to know without AMD's word.
 

Andrew_Carr

New Member
Mar 18, 2022
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Using server as workstation is kinda rough. Lack the IO options.
Threadripper pro is non overclockable, Threadripper is, and has much higher non-ecc clocked ram options for lower latency application requirements.

The problem isn't a change of priorities or a limitation of resources it is communication and clarity. Right now we don't know if there will ever be Zen3 on TRX40. There could be, it could be canceled, impossible to know without AMD's word.
Wait, threadripper pro isn't overclockable? That's pretty bad. What are the IO limitations though? I thought they both had 8+ lanes of memory, 128 pcie lanes, etc. Some of it seemed kind of overkill for threadripper but I guess a carryover from re-badging server parts.
 

NablaSquaredG

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Aug 17, 2020
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but aside from using non-ECC RAM what's the big selling point of threadripper vs epyc
It's much cheaper.

Otherwise they're pretty much identical, apart from TR PRO's support for UDIMMs.

Motherboard lineup for TR PRO is different, there are no real workstation motherboards for EPYC, it's very server focused
 

alex_stief

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May 31, 2016
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It's much cheaper.
Is it though?
Comparing MSRP for Zen2 TR Pro and Epyc Milan shows pretty much price parity. Or even slightly lower prices for Epyc.

Motherboard lineup for TR PRO is different, there are no real workstation motherboards for EPYC, it's very server focused
I wonder if TR Pro is part of the reason why we still have no workstation boards for Epyc. In my headcanon, that's one more reason why TR Pro sucks :p