Windows 11, why, why now, and what matters?

Feb 19, 2021
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Literally just say no. Don't throw out your hardware. Don't buy new gear. Don't use a Microsoft account to use your computer. Just say no.
 

Bjorn Smith

Active Member
Sep 3, 2019
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Well, that makes it easy for me - my ancient Ryzen 7 1700 will not be compatible with windows 11 :) - I mean it ancient with its little more than 4 years of age, surely it would be crazy to support such an ancient CPU.
 
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Markess

Well-Known Member
May 19, 2018
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Well, that makes it easy for me - my ancient Ryzen 7 1700 will not be compatible with windows 11 :) - I mean it ancient with its little more than 4 years of age, surely it would be crazy to support such an ancient CPU.
I decided to use my extra "freetime" during the pandemic to update the homelab from mostly Sandy/Ivy Bridge (Intel Core Gen 2 & 3) & single AMD AM3+ Opteron, along with the family's assorted desktops/laptops, mostly Haswell (Core Gen 4) and older.

I typically buy used, and by the time the chip shortage drove prices up, I'd gotten about half updated to Sky/Kaby Lake (Intel Core Gen 6 & 7), and a Ryzen 5 1400 for the lone AMD system I keep for tinkering. I was feeling pretty good about the generational jump until Microsoft announced that I needed Gen 8 at a minimum for Windows 11. So with the exception of my laptop and my wife's desktop (Rysen 5 3600), everything is "obsolete". Not as much an issue for me, as I really only use Windows for a few apps and games.

Unfortunately, like a lot of folks here, I'm also the free "24/7 Concierge Tech Support" service for my extended family, all of whom use Windows. I sense a series of headaches in my future :rolleyes:
 

Luke07

New Member
Aug 25, 2021
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I'm going to stay on here for a while, thanks to the slick new animations and redesigns, as well as the almost-orgasmic makeover of the sound library.

Because I produced my ISO using UUPDump, the only issues I experienced while using it were during the installation process, but everything else was as simple as it was on W10.

I discovered a fault while running Rocket League in full screen mode, but going to borderless mode fixed it; I assume the taskbar or explorer may have some strange compatibility/graphic difficulties due to the fact that it's still an early build.

All of my program downloaded and installed without a hitch, and I'm impressed at how much effort the developers put in for such an early and new release.
 
Feb 19, 2021
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"and I'm impressed at how much effort the developers put in for such an early and new release."

People paint cars all the time. Imagine if car company x comes to your house, paints your car, locks you out of it, and sells it to you again to drive for another 3 years.

Rinse and repeat.

This is your computer. Not a leased advertising experience.

I'm impressed in all the abuse windows clientele endure.

From forced obsolescence to forced exploitation while they allow known 0 days to go unpatched in the name of catching the bad guy. So let's let criminals drive your car while you sleep it's a feature that allows us to better serve you. This way we can capture their tracking data too for national security sake what fun.

Get off the ride sir. Get off the ride.
 

Bjorn Smith

Active Member
Sep 3, 2019
410
214
43
All of my program downloaded and installed without a hitch, and I'm impressed at how much effort the developers put in for such an early and new release.
A bit unsurprising though - windows 11 is just a patch onto windows 10, so if they broke something they have done something bad. Its not like windows 11 is a new OS, its still the same, just with stuff removed, so its more "secure" and different.
 
Feb 19, 2021
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"its still the same, just with stuff removed, so its more "secure" and different."

New paint does not equal secure. Instead of fixing the problems in the frame and the suspension. Let's just paint it. Our beta testers (customers) will do the security fuzzing for us.

This is standard Microsoft. Why do you think new paint equals more secure? When did Microsoft promise secure?
 

Bjorn Smith

Active Member
Sep 3, 2019
410
214
43
This is standard Microsoft. Why do you think new paint equals more secure? When did Microsoft promise secure?
I guess you missed the "secure" - and by removing old CPU's without security features it by default becomes a little more secure, since they don't have to cater for old useless stuff and can remove code catering for that.

Its kind of just if a car manufacturer removes wheels from their cars, then my guess is that the mortality rate of their customers will drop - and they could claim its more secure.
 
Feb 19, 2021
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It actually was this way in windows 10 already. See below.

TPM recommendations (Windows 10) - Microsoft 365 Security
TPM 2.0 Compliance for Windows 10
Windows 10 for desktop editions (Home, Pro, Enterprise, and Education)

Since July 28, 2016, all new device models, lines or series (or if you are updating the hardware configuration of an existing model, line or series with a major update, such as CPU, graphic cards) must implement and enable by default TPM 2.0 (details in section 3.7 of the Minimum hardware requirements page). The requirement to enable TPM 2.0 only applies to the manufacturing of new devices.

For TPM recommendations for specific Windows features, see TPM and Windows Features