SSD drives just got really really fast

Jeggs101

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Dec 29, 2010
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mrkrad

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Oct 13, 2012
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why lsi has been doing the nytro and warp for ages? They own sandforce.

It's quite easy to go fast, it is quite hard to go fast with redundancy.
 

Jeggs101

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why lsi has been doing the nytro and warp for ages? They own sandforce.

It's quite easy to go fast, it is quite hard to go fast with redundancy.
In theory this is taking that level of performance down a notch and I didn't see a PCIe SandForce controller.
 

dba

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Much faster. Lsi must be shaking. No need for sas controllers except for 4TB disk farms.
Exactly! Dump the SAS controller and go faster... for less money! And if Samsung's version one is 1.6TB, why not a 3.2TB version next year - fast, capacious, and still 2.5" They are PCIe x4, so an 80-lane dual CPU Xeon E5 box could utilize a massive sixteen of them and still have 16 lanes left over for other uses - [by which I of course mean Infiniband cards ;) ]. That would be 50TB of raw space and 48GB/S in a very normal looking 2U server chassis with nothing fancier than a new style of drive connector plus a BIOS update to support the new protocol. Forget 7% faster CPUs each year, this is my idea of real progress.
 
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nitrobass24

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Exactly! Dump the SAS controller and go faster... for less money!
What going to be even more interesting is when NAND Densities/Capacity start encroaching on Spinning Disk at reasonable prices. Its going to be quite the inflection point!

The enterprise market for spinning disk will basically disappear overnight.
 

Salami

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Oct 12, 2012
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Any guess to pricing? I am thinking the 1.6 TB drive should be at least $10,000.
 

dba

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Any guess to pricing? I am thinking the 1.6 TB drive should be at least $10,000.
It will be shockingly expensive to begin with, certainly. But the cost to build them is comparatively low and that means that prices can (and I believe will) fall over time. They want NVMe to play in the desktop/laptop space, so it's likely that we will, as happened with SATA SSD drives, see consumer NVMe parts drive prices ever lower while enterprise-grade NVMe features trickle down into the consumer devices since those features are already part of the driver software or built-in to the Silicon. Quickly enough we'll get what I'm looking for - massive sequential read throughput at reasonable prices.
 

TangoWhiskey9

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It does make you wonder what motherboards will look like in the future. Not sure why I would want a PCIe cable going from a slot to a 2.5" drive rather than just having PCIe cards. Fusion-io, Violin and others already have these
 

PigLover

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It does make you wonder what motherboards will look like in the future. Not sure why I would want a PCIe cable going from a slot to a 2.5" drive rather than just having PCIe cards. Fusion-io, Violin and others already have these
Expect things like this:
- one or two NVMe "slots" on server motherboards
- 1U/2U server chassis with one or two NVMe exposed on the front panel (think next gen DL360/380 or IBM/Dell/etc equivalents)
- Blade designs with single NVMe carriers embedded on the blades (similar to how 2.5" SATA are mounted on blades today)