Extremely hot chipset on the H8SGL-F, need help :/

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discoeels

Member
May 8, 2013
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*Update*Extremely hot chipset on the H8SGL-F, need help :/

I realized I had not updated this when I had it sorted, sorry bout that.

My fans were swapped for
2x Yate Loon front intake &
1x Yate Loon exhaust.
It was a good move to go with those, I folded for
a few hours to double check.

The chipset heatsink still concerned me when i considered
the RAID card and the quad Intel Ethernet card(which is still quite warm.

I bit the bullet and sprung for an Enzotech SLF-40 LP Copper heatsink(active)
Patrick suggested early on to get a fan on it but I
finally found this assembly and now its gravy!

I also collected way too many tiny chipset fans during this process : P


If you have this board I highly suggest this particular
heatsink if your not working with a server pedestal case

*Old*
I finally put together an Opteron box with the following basic SPECs:
Opteron 6234
H8SGL-F
Noctua NH-U9DO w/pwm
650w OCZ Modular
In the Fractal Arc Midi R2.

*Old*
2x stock Fractal Intake fans 140mm
1x stock Fractal Intake 140mm
1x Lepa 140mm pwm Exhaust


*OLD*
The chipset temps stay upward at 60-70c
and I have no idea why this is. I called SuperMicro
and they said I needed a fan blowing directly on
the chip sets. This was news to me as I thought this was a go to workstation board. What am I doing wrong?
 
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dba

Moderator
Feb 20, 2012
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San Francisco Bay Area, California, USA
There may be nothing wrong at all, except that there isn't enough airflow. Those are probably large, slow fans that are very quiet but don't put out enough air for a 12-core board with a server chipset. Do you have any way to channel airflow more directly over the chipset or to add more fans?
 

discoeels

Member
May 8, 2013
40
7
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I'm looking at the case thinking of different possibilities. I'm pretty sure that
these Fractal fans don't cut it. I was just trying to make use of them.
I have a 40mm 5000 rpm Evercool I bought "in case" that I already tried on the heatsink to good effect.
It blocks my pci-e cars though..maybe I should bite th
bullet and get some extenders to sort the heatsink problem for good.
 

Patrick

Administrator
Staff member
Dec 21, 2010
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As a reference point when I use any server board in anything other than a close rack mount enclosure I always put a fan on the chipset and SAS chip if present.
 

discoeels

Member
May 8, 2013
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So it sounds like getting fans on those heatsinks will get me back on the right track? When I look back now I'm seeing that
some of the other cases I looked at brought a few more options for cooling then the fractal.
Would it be more efficient to use higher rpm 120mm fans that would provide more concentrated airflow then these lazy 140mm's? This is honestly the first build
I've done with all 140mm fans and honestly,I'm not too impressed.
 

dba

Moderator
Feb 20, 2012
1,477
184
63
San Francisco Bay Area, California, USA
So it sounds like getting fans on those heatsinks will get me back on the right track? When I look back now I'm seeing that
some of the other cases I looked at brought a few more options for cooling then the fractal.
Would it be more efficient to use higher rpm 120mm fans that would provide more concentrated airflow then these lazy 140mm's? This is honestly the first build
I've done with all 140mm fans and honestly,I'm not too impressed.
The biggest issue that I see with those large-volume workstation cases is that, whatever fans are installed, they mostly blow air over empty space. Doubling the speed of every fan would double the amount of air flowing over the chipset, but then again so would installing a tiny fan very near the chipset itself or adding some ducting to channel airflow over the chipset. If it was me, and the chipset was the only hotspot, I'd go with Patrick's chipset-fan approach.
 

nitrobass24

Moderator
Dec 26, 2010
1,087
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TX
Just something to remember, while this may be a "workstation" board, you have to remember that SM makes their workstation chassis like tower server chassis. They are pumping out serious airflow.

When I had a SM board in my workstation I had put a fan on the chipset because it was so bad the system would randomly reset.
 

Salami

New Member
Oct 12, 2012
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It appears to me that big CPU Heatsink doesn't help the chipset, because it is blocking cool air from the fan on the left of the picture, and also blowing hot air on to it from the CPU. A chipset fan is going to be your cheapest/easiest fix.

I think SM expects you to use their chassis with their motherboards, and they are designed with that in mind.
 

sotech

Member
Jul 13, 2011
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One thing which may help with that case is to put your SSD in one of the lower bays and take out the top bay altogether. Removing that significant obstruction should free up airflow a little, and while it won't help as much as a fan directly onto the chipset it won't hurt.
 

discoeels

Member
May 8, 2013
40
7
8
Thanks for all the reply's, I appreciate it. I wanted to give an update on where things are.

A fan on the chipsets will be the first order of buisness.
*Edit* It was a mixup with Supermicro and I'm still
trying to figure out a way to get a fan on the chipsets
and use the PCI-E slots. Are there any 3-7cm ribbon risers?

Im going to get rid of these 140mm fractal fans and replace them with 120mm fans that have
2x+ the RPMs so that should help. The # of hard drives that I will be putting in is TBD so I'm not too sure on that yet.

One thing I'm debating is turning the CPU heatsink but it seems kind of goofy to do that no?
as of now its intake faces the front and exhausts towards the back. I assume its better to leave it as is but if not I'm open to suggestions.

This has been a learning process as this is my first server board,
I now know better then to go for fans emphasizing "quiet". Any suggestions for the future?
 
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