CWWK i5-1235U 6 port i226 report

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fta

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Feb 19, 2017
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EDIT: Unlocked BIOS is available here.

EDIT 2: A good replacement for the junk power supply is this one, and note that you also need to get a cord for it if you don't have one already.

EDIT 3: This script will set up the box for high performance (linux only, works in proxmox).

EDIT 4: If you want to set up the performance settings in the BIOS rather than at runtime with a script, see this post.

I've been playing with this barebones CWWK i5-1235U box from aliexpress. I plan to run proxmox with several VMs (including OPNSense) and lots of docker containers on it so I wanted a fair bit of power. I ordered it on Feb 8, and it was marked shipped less than an hour later. I received it on Feb 16. I took it apart, mainly just to check it out but also to make sure it has good thermal paste. Overall, this is a much better thermal design than the popular Topton N5105 boxes. You can see in the first pic the motherboard is screwed down to the copper plate to ensure the CPU and plate have good contact:

IMG_1469.jpegIMG_1470.jpegIMG_1471.jpegIMG_1472.jpegIMG_1473.jpegIMG_1474.jpegIMG_1475.jpeg

It came with a fan pre-installed. It is inaudible when powered on:

IMG_1468.jpeg

It came with a no name, junk "96W" power supply:

IMG_1476.jpeg

I installed Windows 11 on it and played around. Here are what CPU-Z and Hwinfo report:

cpu-z.pnghwinfo.png

Note that you see Hwinfo is reporting that SST (Intel Speed Shift aka Hardware P-States aka HWP) is enabled. You will not get this with the stock BIOS! There is a bug in the BIOS that prevents you from turning on HWP. Speaking of the BIOS, it is very locked down compare to other Ali boxes. It does not have many settings enabled.

It idles at 15-16W in both Windows and Linux:

IMG_1507.jpeg

If you try to run prime95/small fft with this box, it crashes. I eventually diagnosed this to the junk PS not being able to deliver the initial inrush of current when the test starts. The voltage drop causes the CPU to crash. I replaced it with a GlobTek 90W PS, and that solved it. For comparison of how junky the included PS is, check out the weight compared to the GlobTek:

IMG_1488.jpegIMG_1503.jpeg

From looking at throttlestop and other tools, I can see the stock BIOS settings are PL1=15, PL2=55, and Tau=28. Here is running prime95 with the stock BIOS:

aida_power.pngaida_temp.png

You can see it briefly touches 55W, then falls back to 15W. You can see that the thermal design is very good. It could run forever at 15W and stay in the mid 50s for temperature. However, the test doesn't look right. It's neither hitting a thermal limit nor the PL2 limit. What is going on? After lots of testing, I figured out it is actually being throttled due to VR TDC Limit, which stands for Voltage Regulator Thermal Design Current Limit. It turns out no matter what value you put in PL2, you are always limited by VR TDC Limit, not PL2. This is really bad because it prevents you from using all of the power of this CPU!

Here is passmark:

passmark.png

And crystaldiskmark:

disk.png

And finally, idle temps:

root@pve:~# sensors
coretemp-isa-0000
Adapter: ISA adapter
Package id 0: +38.0°C (high = +100.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 0: +34.0°C (high = +100.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 4: +35.0°C (high = +100.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 8: +34.0°C (high = +100.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 9: +35.0°C (high = +100.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 10: +35.0°C (high = +100.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 11: +35.0°C (high = +100.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 12: +37.0°C (high = +100.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 13: +37.0°C (high = +100.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 14: +37.0°C (high = +100.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
Core 15: +37.0°C (high = +100.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)

acpitz-acpi-0
Adapter: ACPI interface
temp1: +27.8°C (crit = +105.0°C)

nvme-pci-0100
Adapter: PCI adapter
Composite: +45.9°C (low = -5.2°C, high = +79.8°C)(crit = +84.8°C)


So, can we solve the problems with the not-so-great BIOS this thing comes with? As my comment about SST above alluded to, it turns out we can! I'll detail that in a later post.
 
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Vince

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Feb 17, 2023
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So, can we solve the problems with the not-so-great BIOS this thing comes with? As my comment about SST above alluded to, it turns out we can! I'll detail that in a later post.
I'm seeing all the same limits with the 1215U I just got. I haven't figured out a way to increase those limits yet, so I'm excited to see what you've done.
 

fta

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Feb 19, 2017
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With the VR TDC Limit fixed in the BIOS, I run with PL1=22 and PL2=40. The default PL2=55 is too high and will thermal limit before TAU does its thing. At 40W the temps will spike a bit, but I'm not afraid of it since the thermal design keeps it well under PROCHOT=100. Here is the test:

aida_power.pngaida_temp.png

Now you can see it goes up to my PL2=40, runs there until it hits TAU=28, and then drops down to my PL1=22. It's working exactly as it is supposed to!

With my BIOS I've enabled all of the advanced settings so I am able to undervolt the CPU. That combined with the fixes above, and here is an updated passmark:

passmark.png

A 22% improvement in CPU Mark!

With the stock BIOS, I'd say this system is ok, but probably not worth the cost since the VR TDC limit is so restrictive. With my fixed BIOS, I can give this system two thumbs up. It's super powerful and configurable, and the fanless thermal design is better than I expected.

I'll detail how to upgrade to my BIOS in the next post.
 

fta

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!!!!!!!!! WARNING !!!!!!!!!

This BIOS is provided with no warranty. Updating your BIOS is usually safe, but there is still a risk of problems, to include bricking your system. You are solely responsible if you mess up your system by updating to this BIOS or by changing any of the advanced settings after updating to it.

!!!!!!!!! WARNING !!!!!!!!!



BIOS Downloads:
Make sure to unzip the file after you download it.


BIOS update directions:
  1. Download the stock BIOS in .iso format
  2. Burn the ISO to a USB flash drive using Rufus
  3. On the USB flash drive, replace CW-12TH/bios/6067009_CW_LOGO.BIN with this BIOS (rename it to 6067009_CW_LOGO.BIN)
  4. Make sure to eject the USB flash drive before removing it from your computer
  5. Boot from the USB drive. Do NOT remove your NVME SSD like you had to do on previous BIOS updates
  6. The BIOS update process will start automatically and reboot when completed.
  7. Enter the BIOS setup and marvel at all of the settings now available

Fix the VR TDC Limit problem:
  1. Enter the BIOS setup
  2. Advanced->Reserved Menus->Power & Performance->CPU - Power Management Control->CPU VR Settings->Core/IA VR Settings->TDC Current Limit->640
The value 640 is 80A, which is the same as the default IccMax in this BIOS.
 
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skimikes

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Jun 27, 2022
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!!!!!!!!! WARNING !!!!!!!!!

This BIOS is provided with no warranty. Updating your BIOS is usually safe, but there is still a risk of problems, to include bricking your system. You are solely responsible if you mess up your system by updating to this BIOS or by changing any of the advanced settings after updating to it.

!!!!!!!!! WARNING !!!!!!!!!



There are two versions available. One has HWP turned off and the other has HWP turned on. This would normally be done in the BIOS setup, but for some reason this question is missing in this BIOS.

HWP Off
HWP On

Make sure to unzip the file after you download it.


Note: use Google Chrome for the Chinese sites. It will prompt you to translate to English.

BIOS update directions:
  1. Download the stock BIOS from ChangWang in .iso format
  2. Burn the ISO to a USB flash drive using Rufus
  3. On the USB flash drive, replace ChangWang/ChangWang.BIN with this BIOS (rename it to ChangWang.BIN)
  4. Make sure to eject the USB flash drive before removing it from your computer
  5. Follow the BIOS update instructions to update your BIOS, note that you need to remove your NVME SSD before booting the USB flash drive
  6. Enter the BIOS setup and marvel at all of the settings now available

Fix the VR TDC Limit problem:
  1. Enter the BIOS setup
  2. Advanced->Power & Performance->CPU - Power Management Control->CPU VR Settings->Core/IA VR Settings->TDC Current Limit->640
The value 640 is 80A, which is the same as the default IccMax in this BIOS.


Optionally, undervolt the CPU:
  1. Enter the BIOS setup
  2. Advanced->OverClocking Performance Menu->OverClocking Feature->Enabled
  3. Advanced->OverClocking Performance Menu->UnderVolt Protection->Disabled
  4. Advanced->Power & Performance->CPU - Power Management Control->CPU VR Settings->Core/IA VR Settings->AC Loadline->70
The value 70 is 0.7 mOhms. It requires testing to verify it is a good value for your CPU since it depends on the silicon lottery.
My 8505 uses this same BIOS so I will give it a shot at some point over the next day or two. Hopefully I don't brick it. I'll need to get a new Windows drive set up so I can see my cpumark before/after scores. 22% is no joke. I'm already very pleased with the performance and behavior of this device over the N6005/N5105/J6413 units I have.
 

skimikes

Member
Jun 27, 2022
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18
!!!!!!!!! WARNING !!!!!!!!!

This BIOS is provided with no warranty. Updating your BIOS is usually safe, but there is still a risk of problems, to include bricking your system. You are solely responsible if you mess up your system by updating to this BIOS or by changing any of the advanced settings after updating to it.

!!!!!!!!! WARNING !!!!!!!!!



There are two versions available. One has HWP turned off and the other has HWP turned on. This would normally be done in the BIOS setup, but for some reason this question is missing in this BIOS.

HWP Off
HWP On

Make sure to unzip the file after you download it.


Note: use Google Chrome for the Chinese sites. It will prompt you to translate to English.

BIOS update directions:
  1. Download the stock BIOS from ChangWang in .iso format
  2. Burn the ISO to a USB flash drive using Rufus
  3. On the USB flash drive, replace ChangWang/ChangWang.BIN with this BIOS (rename it to ChangWang.BIN)
  4. Make sure to eject the USB flash drive before removing it from your computer
  5. Follow the BIOS update instructions to update your BIOS, note that you need to remove your NVME SSD before booting the USB flash drive
  6. Enter the BIOS setup and marvel at all of the settings now available

Fix the VR TDC Limit problem:
  1. Enter the BIOS setup
  2. Advanced->Power & Performance->CPU - Power Management Control->CPU VR Settings->Core/IA VR Settings->TDC Current Limit->640
The value 640 is 80A, which is the same as the default IccMax in this BIOS.


Optionally, undervolt the CPU:
  1. Enter the BIOS setup
  2. Advanced->OverClocking Performance Menu->OverClocking Feature->Enabled
  3. Advanced->OverClocking Performance Menu->UnderVolt Protection->Disabled
  4. Advanced->Power & Performance->CPU - Power Management Control->CPU VR Settings->Core/IA VR Settings->AC Loadline->70
The value 70 is 0.7 mOhms. It requires testing to verify it is a good value for your CPU since it depends on the silicon lottery.
What did you use to unlock the larger suite of options? The Intel Aptio Integrator Tool? Asking since it is very possible that additional BIOS releases will occur over the next couple months and it would be good to know the method so as not to lose functionality when updating.
 
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Vince

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Feb 17, 2023
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I'm able to install your unlocked BIOS on my i3-1215U. Thanks! I took some different steps to install it:
  1. Download the stock BIOS in zip format
  2. unzip onto empty, FAT-formatted USB drive (or microSD)
  3. Overwite ChangWang/ChangWang.BIN with the new BIOS, eject drive properly
  4. Remove all NVMe/SATA drives from mini pc
  5. Boot with USB/microSD inserted
  6. BIOS will automatically update
There sure are many more options available! Including serial console redirect for anyone who's interested in that.

I'm unable to replicate your performance improvements, however. With all the settings I've tried, I'm still getting a max of 35W, then dropping to 15W. But now it only stays at 35W for a couple seconds instead of 20. I tried TDC Current Limit=640, then added PL1=22W, PL2=40W, and finally AC Loadline=70. I'm going to keep poking around with the settings to see if I can get any different results.
 

fta

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What did you use to unlock the larger suite of options? The Intel Aptio Integrator Tool? Asking since it is very possible that additional BIOS releases will occur over the next couple months and it would be good to know the method so as not to lose functionality when updating.
All open source:


Changing HWP can be done with a Hex editor, but I wrote a small python script to do it.
 

fta

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I'm unable to replicate your performance improvements, however. With all the settings I've tried, I'm still getting a max of 35W, then dropping to 15W. But now it only stays at 35W for a couple seconds instead of 20. I tried TDC Current Limit=640, then added PL1=22W, PL2=40W, and finally AC Loadline=70. I'm going to keep poking around with the settings to see if I can get any different results.
What OS are you running on? For linux, I have a script that runs at boot that sets PL1 and PL2. On windows I used throttlestop to set them. This is my linux script:

Bash:
#!/bin/bash

PL1=22000000
PL1_TAU=28000000
PL2=40000000

RAPL=("intel-rapl" "intel-rapl-mmio")

for ii in ${RAPL[@]}; do
  if [ -e /sys/class/powercap/$ii ]; then
    /usr/bin/powercap-set -p $ii -z 0 -c 0 -l $PL1 -s $PL1_TAU
    /usr/bin/powercap-set -p $ii -z 0 -c 1 -l $PL2
  fi
done

echo powersave | tee /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpufreq/policy*/scaling_governor > /dev/null
echo balance_performance | tee /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpufreq/policy*/energy_performance_preference > /dev/null
echo balance-power | tee /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu*/power/energy_perf_bias > /dev/null
Make sure intel dynamic tuning framework is turned on in the BIOS. The user supplied RAPL limits don't seem to work correctly without it. Note that this script is specific to HWP being on. You don't want to use the powersave governor if HWP is off.
 
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fta

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With the BIOS unlock, we now have access to the TCC Offset in the BIOS. This lets you set a max temp that the hardware will limit the CPU to. It is enabled by setting the TCC Offset Time Window to non-zero. I have it set to 3 seconds. If you set the TCC Offset unlock in the same screen, it will allow you to set the TCC offset at runtime. I limit the temp at 80.

Advanced>Thermal Configuration>Cpu Thermal Configuration>Tcc Offset Time Window

So now my at boot script is this:

Bash:
#!/bin/bash

PL1=55000000
PL1_TAU=28000000
PL2=55000000
MAX_TEMP=80

RAPL=("intel-rapl" "intel-rapl-mmio")

for ii in ${RAPL[@]}; do
  if [ -e /sys/class/powercap/$ii ]; then
    /usr/bin/powercap-set -p $ii -z 0 -c 0 -l $PL1 -s $PL1_TAU
    /usr/bin/powercap-set -p $ii -z 0 -c 1 -l $PL2
  fi
done

echo powersave | tee /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpufreq/policy*/scaling_governor > /dev/null
echo balance_performance | tee /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpufreq/policy*/energy_performance_preference > /dev/null
echo balance-power | tee /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu*/power/energy_perf_bias > /dev/null

for cdev in /sys/class/thermal/cooling_device*; do
  if [ "$(cat $cdev/type)" = "TCC Offset" ]; then
    tcc_offset=$(expr 100 - $MAX_TEMP)
    echo $tcc_offset > $cdev/cur_state
  fi
done
You'll need to install the powercap-utils package on your box to use this script.

With my BIOS changes and this setup, it now will run unlimited until the temp hits 80 and then be throttled to 80 until the load comes down. The undervolting and the thermal design actually allows it to run for quite a while at much higher power than you would expect. Here is my new passmark result. It's now 33% faster than stock!
 
Last edited:

Vince

New Member
Feb 17, 2023
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What OS are you running on? For linux, I have a script that runs at boot that sets PL1 and PL2. On windows I used throttlestop to set them. This is my linux script:

Make sure intel dynamic tuning framework is turned on in the BIOS. The user supplied RAPL limits don't seem to work correctly without it. Note that this script is specific to HWP being on. You don't want to use the powersave governor if HWP is off.
I'm using the HWP BIOS, and running Linux. I was writing directly to the /sys/class/powertop/... files to set PL1/PL2, which is what powercap-set does under the hood. PL1 changed to 22W with those settings, but PL2 never gets over 35W.

Today I added in the TCC Offset settings, and used your latest script, and I'm getting a consistent 35W package usage which will continue indefinitely without overheating. It seems it just can't get over 35W, or maybe it's read/reported differently by s-tui?

Now, I just ran PassMark, and I'm getting a CPU Mark of 14304 (results), which is off the charts for the submitted benchmarks for my CPU, just as yours are off the charts for your CPU. So I'm thinking this is pretty much the most performance I'm going to squeeze out of this i3-1215U. Thank you for all the work you've put in here, it's been really helpful.
 

fta

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Feb 19, 2017
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Today I added in the TCC Offset settings, and used your latest script, and I'm getting a consistent 35W package usage which will continue indefinitely without overheating. It seems it just can't get over 35W, or maybe it's read/reported differently by s-tui?
I did a test where I ran prime95/small fft but only specified 6 cores + hyperthreading. It used about 35W max so I think you're correct that the 1215U tops out there since it only has 6 cores. It will probably gradually reduce power the longer it runs. My testing has shown that the thermal design steady state is around 27-28W.

Now, I just ran PassMark, and I'm getting a CPU Mark of 14304 (results), which is off the charts for the submitted benchmarks for my CPU, just as yours are off the charts for your CPU. So I'm thinking this is pretty much the most performance I'm going to squeeze out of this i3-1215U. Thank you for all the work you've put in here, it's been really helpful.
Awesome! That's excellent performance for the price.
 
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skimikes

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Jun 27, 2022
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Ive been down with the flu for the past few days so I haven't had a chance to play with this but here are the stock scores for the 8505 before BIOS update:
Code:
Intel Pentium Gold 8505 (x86_64)
6 cores @ 2501 MHz  |  62.6 GiB RAM
Number of Processes: 6  |  Test Iterations: 1  |  Test Duration: Medium
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
CPU Mark:                          9831
  Integer Math                     31655 Million Operations/s
  Floating Point Math              20713 Million Operations/s
  Prime Numbers                    40.0 Million Primes/s
  Sorting                          16473 Thousand Strings/s
  Encryption                       6956 MB/s
  Compression                      99896 KB/s
  CPU Single Threaded              2031 Million Operations/s
  Physics                          871 Frames/s
  Extended Instructions (SSE)      4949 Million Matrices/s

Memory Mark:                       3311
  Database Operations              4394 Thousand Operations/s
  Memory Read Cached               32469 MB/s
  Memory Read Uncached             21337 MB/s
  Memory Write                     16064 MB/s
  Available RAM                    57236 Megabytes
  Memory Latency                   42 Nanoseconds
  Memory Threaded                  34104 MB/s
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Results submitted: https://www.passmark.com/baselines/V10/display.php?id=503402120512
Hopefully I will be able to play around with this over the weekend.

I'm running the Proxmox 6.1 kernel on that device which I think uses the rapl tools instead of powercap. Will have to see if the powercap tools still work on it.
 
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fta

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I'm running the Proxmox 6.1 kernel on that device which I think uses the rapl tools instead of powercap. Will have to see if the powercap tools still work on it.
That's what I'm running so if you set up the BIOS with the settings I've detailed, my script should be all you need. The rapl tools are actually deprecated in favor of the powercap tools. The powercap tools are using the rapl interface behind the scenes.
 
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skimikes

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Using the HWP-enabled BIOS above, following all the tuning recommendations doesn't make a significant performance difference for my 8505 unit.

With all of the BIOS tunes (including the TCC Offset options) and the second bash script settings applied, I went from 9831 to 10213 - a 4% performance improvement:

Code:
Intel Pentium Gold 8505 (x86_64)
6 cores @ 4400 MHz  |  62.6 GiB RAM
Number of Processes: 6  |  Test Iterations: 1  |  Test Duration: Medium
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
CPU Mark:                          10213
  Integer Math                     31611 Million Operations/s
  Floating Point Math              20680 Million Operations/s
  Prime Numbers                    40.1 Million Primes/s
  Sorting                          15606 Thousand Strings/s
  Encryption                       7737 MB/s
  Compression                      108773 KB/s
  CPU Single Threaded              3649 Million Operations/s
  Physics                          877 Frames/s
  Extended Instructions (SSE)      4613 Million Matrices/s

Memory Mark:                       3282
  Database Operations              4852 Thousand Operations/s
  Memory Read Cached               32474 MB/s
  Memory Read Uncached             21661 MB/s
  Memory Write                     16157 MB/s
  Available RAM                    62780 Megabytes
  Memory Latency                   44 Nanoseconds
  Memory Threaded                  34629 MB/s
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Results submitted: https://www.passmark.com/baselines/V10/display.php?id=503419038346
 

Vince

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Feb 17, 2023
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Code:
  CPU Single Threaded              3649 Million Operations/s
That's a massive improvement in single threaded performance. That test comes later in the benchmark, so it shows that your CPU isn't throttling down as quickly as before. It's also a lot more relevant to a lot of workloads (like mine) than the multi-core scores.
 

fta

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As @Vince pointed out, you've got a huge improvement in single threaded. To double check the multithreaded scenario, run s-tui and watch the package power. Start up prime95 with small fft configuration. If the package power rises really high then falls back to something much lower, then you'll need to double check your BIOS settings.

EDIT: Also, make sure you are not doing any undervolting. That is specific to the CPU so it's better to test without it.
 
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fta

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As an example of why you have to be careful with undervolting: my initial undervolt setting of 70 was too much. The single thread passmark should be the same with the 8505, 1215U, and the 1235U because they each have a performance core that boosts to 4.4GHz. Mine was showing a lower score. I did some testing and now I have the AC Loadline at 100. My single thread passmark is now essentially the same as the 8505 and 1215U:

Code:
12th Gen Intel Core i5-1235U (x86_64)
12 cores @ 4400 MHz  |  31.1 GiB RAM
Number of Processes: 12  |  Test Iterations: 1  |  Test Duration: Medium
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
CPU Mark:                          19080
  Integer Math                     60607 Million Operations/s
  Floating Point Math              39277 Million Operations/s
  Prime Numbers                    46.5 Million Primes/s
  Sorting                          30989 Thousand Strings/s
  Encryption                       15578 MB/s
  Compression                      226888 KB/s
  CPU Single Threaded              3606 Million Operations/s
  Physics                          1093 Frames/s
  Extended Instructions (SSE)      11791 Million Matrices/s

Memory Mark:                       3190
  Database Operations              8580 Thousand Operations/s
  Memory Read Cached               32661 MB/s
  Memory Read Uncached             19803 MB/s
  Memory Write                     14056 MB/s
  Available RAM                    30282 Megabytes
  Memory Latency                   46 Nanoseconds
  Memory Threaded                  44172 MB/s
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Results submitted: https://www.passmark.com/baselines/V10/display.php?id=503422239075
 
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skimikes

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Jun 27, 2022
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That's a massive improvement in single threaded performance. That test comes later in the benchmark, so it shows that your CPU isn't throttling down as quickly as before. It's also a lot more relevant to a lot of workloads (like mine) than the multi-core scores.
I'm not putting too much stock in that single threaded score because, on these big+little architectures, that score will change depending what core that particular test gets pinned to.

Running the CPU test repeatedly, my single-threaded scores were:
2034
3652
2026
3616
2031
3651
3596
3615
3594
3561

So I think that my first stats dump may have just been a run on an E-core versus the one P-core that my processor has.

If we look at the total picture:

ValueBeforeAfter% change
CPU Mark983110213+3.89%
Integer Math3165531611-0.14%
Floating Point Math2071320680-0.16%
Prime Numbers40.040.1+0.25%
Sorting1647315606-5.26%
Encryption69567737+11.23%
Compression99896108773+8.89%
CPU Single Threaded20313649+79.67% (we can't compare P to E-core)
Physics871877+0.69%
Extended Instructions (SSE)49494613-6.79%

I'm pretty happy with my numbers either way since they're already 30% better than the 7600 score that is floating around for the 8505.

My suspicion is that the more P-cores you have, the more room to grow you have using the tuning options fta provided. With the 8505, I only have 1 performance core, so thermals don't come into play as quickly.

On the stock BIOS, I can get the following performance numbers (again discounting the fact that it happened to choose an E-core rather than a P-core for the single-threaded test) just by running fta's original bash script with some insignificant edits:

Code:
CPU Mark:                          10802
  Integer Math                     31700 Million Operations/s
  Floating Point Math              20711 Million Operations/s
  Prime Numbers                    40.4 Million Primes/s
  Sorting                          16338 Thousand Strings/s
  Encryption                       8093 MB/s
  Compression                      122092 KB/s
  CPU Single Threaded              2030 Million Operations/s
  Physics                          912 Frames/s
  Extended Instructions (SSE)      6327 Million Matrices/s
Encryption is up 16%, compression is up 22%, and SSE is up 27%. The overall CPU Mark score, however that number is determined, is up 10%.
 
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fta

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I concur. Here's a run with 1 P-Core and 4 E-Cores enabled on the 1235U, which basically turns it into an 8505:

Code:
12th Gen Intel Core i5-1235U (x86_64)
6 cores @ 4400 MHz  |  31.1 GiB RAM
Number of Processes: 6  |  Test Iterations: 1  |  Test Duration: Medium
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
CPU Mark:                          10965
  Integer Math                     31368 Million Operations/s
  Floating Point Math              20641 Million Operations/s
  Prime Numbers                    50.2 Million Primes/s
  Sorting                          16329 Thousand Strings/s
  Encryption                       7908 MB/s
  Compression                      112378 KB/s
  CPU Single Threaded              3641 Million Operations/s
  Physics                          1019 Frames/s
  Extended Instructions (SSE)      5765 Million Matrices/s
There's just not much above stock to get out of the 8505.
 
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