xeon e-2278G missing from stores

daumas

New Member
Sep 20, 2019
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My fan does not throttle at all, and bios has no settings for it. IPMI gives 3 choices, all of which run my fans at 2000 RPM (max). I tried about 4 windows motherboard fan control utils, but they either do not detect fan speed, or do not affect the speed. Not happy with the noise level.. Also, if I plug in a second fan, the watercooler fans start doing 3 seconds loud, then about 10 seconds quiet oscillation loop. Like a square wave.

Anybody know how to control these Supermicro motherboards? I have a X!!SCA-F. The workstation (W) option has bios settings according to my manual. Yay for them..
Yeah, in Linux you can use 'ipmitool' to set fan levels. I'm not sure if there's a Windows equivalent.

It's stupid that Supermicro doesn't offer a UEFI entry or something in the IPMI directly to set the fan thresholds... every other motherboard vendor in the universe does.
 

RobertC

New Member
Apr 8, 2016
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I made some progress on the fan noise. I stumbled across a tip about the fans ramping, or staying loud. The solution is to reboot the BMC.

After that, it is much less annoying.
 

Jeff Robertson

Active Member
Oct 18, 2016
421
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Chico, CA
I made some progress on the fan noise. I stumbled across a tip about the fans ramping, or staying loud. The solution is to reboot the BMC.

After that, it is much less annoying.
Don't know if you've got it working properly or not be these are my notes on controlling fans via ipmi:

How To: change sensor thresholds with IPMI using ipmiutil



Extract
Ipmiutil-3.0.1-win64.zip to the c:\windows directory

To view fans:
ipmiutil sensor -N *IPAddress* -U *uname -P *pword* -c

To set fans speeds:
ipmiutil sensor -N *IPAddress* -U *uname* -P *pword* -n *Snum* -l 200 -h 1900
Where the -l is the low threshhold and the -h is the high threshhold
 

yxman

New Member
Aug 18, 2019
1
1
1
My E-2288G is also finally installed and functioning just fine. The Supermicro 2x16GB ECC RAM finally arrived... X11SCH-LN4F IPMI and BIOS updated successfully. Integrated graphics are working (video encode and decode). Linux now boots in about 5 seconds on the NVME drive compared to 60+ seconds on the old HDD RAID1 setup I am coming from.

If anyone is curious my CPU date of manufacturer was May 2019 and the motherboard had the 2018 BIOS on it. No problems getting it all working and updated.
thx for the info, xeon e-2200 finally showing up in german shops, got the same board with current bios and a i3-9100f as placeholder ;)
 
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voip-ninja

Member
Apr 5, 2019
33
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I tweeted Intel over the weekend trying to understand why the 2278 that was launched in "April" is still not available in October of 2019.

Intel had the nerve to reply to my tweet that the E-2278G is "widely available" at "any Intel retailers near you" and even provided a link to their reseller finder tool.

I've been waiting on availability of this processor for over two months to do a new ESXi build and migrate my home server off of Windows 10 and onto VMWare.

My mind is blown with Intel's sudden lack of competence.
 

jingram

Member
Oct 21, 2018
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I tweeted Intel over the weekend trying to understand why the 2278 that was launched in "April" is still not available in October of 2019.

Intel had the nerve to reply to my tweet that the E-2278G is "widely available" at "any Intel retailers near you" and even provided a link to their reseller finder tool.

I've been waiting on availability of this processor for over two months to do a new ESXi build and migrate my home server off of Windows 10 and onto VMWare.

My mind is blown with Intel's sudden lack of competence.
Same thing happened with the 2100 series Xeons. It is ridiculous!
 
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voip-ninja

Member
Apr 5, 2019
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December 10th, still not available.

What the hell Intel? If I thought I could be a reliable AMD machine for VMWare I would be doing that at this point.
 

Terry Kennedy

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Jun 25, 2015
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December 10th, still not available.
Quoting The Register, according to HP, shipments are going to supercomputer / hyperscale systems first, then servers, workstations, desktops in that order. Presumably "most favored nation" vendors like HP first, then white-box integrators, with anything left falling into the retail channel.

Intel really blew it with their 10nm fiasco, and not realizing soon enough that there was a problem and looking for alternate solutions. The pipeline for wafers used to be pretty long, so even with a perfect fab process and high yields appearing by magic today, you wouldn't see finished parts coming out of Intel for quite a while.

If I were Intel, I'd probably OTP any dies that met the server specs as server, whereas when times were flush some server-spec parts were fused as workstation parts and sold that way would now be sold as server parts. And do the same all the way down the line. This assumes that various parts from a specific generation are OTP'd to the various market segments based on binning and market demand. I can't see Intel having a zillion different production lines (or worse, split masks) - I'd guess there are at most 6 different base parts being produced for any specific generation, then binned as needed.

Also, assuming that I required (these are numbers I randomly pulled out of an orifice, I don't know anything about current binning processes and have never worked for Intel) a 25% margin (part must be clockable at 25% above the speed the part is fused and sold as) and similar reductions in other margining tests, I might drop that margin to 20% and issue a "Confidential" erratum to my OEM customers saying that these parts still meet specs, but that "temporary process changes" were made for the following parts in order to meet production goals.
 

Patrick

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Dec 21, 2010
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The Intel Xeon E-2200 is a platform that has a server team but is dictated by the workstation guys. I think Intel has the luxury of AMD not wanting to compete here.

Your are right though. Retail sales are not high priority in this segment.
 

voip-ninja

Member
Apr 5, 2019
33
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The Intel Xeon E-2200 is a platform that has a server team but is dictated by the workstation guys. I think Intel has the luxury of AMD not wanting to compete here.

Your are right though. Retail sales are not high priority in this segment.
I definitely realize I'm in the minority wanting this processor for home server use. The overwhelming majority of hobbyists will simply buy an i9 or do a Ryzen and call it good.

I want this chip because of the newer graphics core (will use for GPU transcode in Plex), low TDP and ability to use ECC memory...

It seems ideal for use as a lower power lower cost option hypervisor host. I had been looking for quite some time at buying a refurbished Dell server but the reality is that they are complete overkill for running a handful of services in a modern connected home (Plex Linux server, Windows 10 server and an assortment of light weight Linux items). It's quite sad that it will already be getting long in the tooth before it is even available at retail.

If anyone can recommend an alternative I'm all ears. I need a rock solid CPU for running ESXi as I have a spare server license available and would rather run commercial hypervisor software than run something free-ware that has limited or no support.
 

ReturnedSword

Active Member
Jun 15, 2018
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I created a build list months ago for the Xeon E 2200, and now here we are with no availability yet. By the time it's widely available, the next greatest thing probably will be announced and thus the waiting cycle continues. I probably could do with a i3-9100 in the meantime, but would really like to have 128GB support.
 

Terry Kennedy

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Jun 25, 2015
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I created a build list months ago for the Xeon E 2200, and now here we are with no availability yet. By the time it's widely available, the next greatest thing probably will be announced and thus the waiting cycle continues. I probably could do with a i3-9100 in the meantime, but would really like to have 128GB support.
Those $350 Dell T40 servers mentioned in the "great deals" thread have delivery dates that slipped into March 2020, so apparently even Dell is having a hard time getting 2200 processors, even the entry-level ones like the one in that deal.

Hopefully, once Intel gets past their 10nm debacle we won't see this sort of massive delay between announcement and availability in the future.

OTOH, it would be interesting to see AMD introduce an ECC-capable (with mandatory motherboard / BIOS support) enthusiast-class processor.
 

TXAG26

Active Member
Aug 2, 2016
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OTOH, it would be interesting to see AMD introduce an ECC-capable (with mandatory motherboard / BIOS support) enthusiast-class processor.
It would be great if AMD had an ECC-capable enthusiast-class processor, BUT I want it paired with a true workstation class motherboard. I am completely put off by every single Threadripper and Ryzen motherboard with the black PCB's, RGB lighting, whizzy fans and plastic plates with stickers and other wiz bang stupid features, and the ridiculous names, geeez! How about they ditch all the fancy crapola, paint, and stickers, and focus on making a quality rock-solid board.