Thinking about a TMM...

memilanuk

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Jan 31, 2021
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So... been looking at expanding the home network a bit this year. Probably going to get a small NAS (been a while), and also hoping to start self-hosting a few things. Anticipating very light usage - me, the wife, maybe a few family members around holidays, etc. Never attempted (yet) running all the usual self-hosting / media applications yet, so I have little idea what I will eventually decide I want to really do with this setup, beyond backup storage / NVR with the NAS.

I had been leaning towards going the RPi4 route - already have a handful of various models for different things (B & B+ set up with `pihole` + `unbound`, and a 3B+ running Unifi controller and `pivpn`). Setting up a 4B+ for USB boot plus a USB storage drive using OMV5 seemed like an okay idea. More or less have already, just the 'storage drive' is a pretty old laptop 2.5" HDD in an old USB (BOT, not UASP) enclosure. Most of the devices on the home network *other* than the RPi's are connecting via wifi, thru a single Unifi Nano HD AP. I do have plans to run cat6 to the living/family areas, eventually.

It works... but reading about the Tiny-Mini-Micro project has me wondering if it might be a better idea to snag one of those off eBay, stuff as much RAM in it as it'll take, add some additional storage (internal if I can, external/attached if I can't) and benefit from the joys of Intel/AMD 64 bit architecture without the quirks of an RPi, while still enjoying lower power and noise (compared to anything bigger).

For this sort of thing... what kind of balance should I be looking for, as far as CPU, RAM and storage? Sounds like the memory and storage can be upgraded easily enough after the purchase; processor/video less so. At what point is adding extra RAM worth it (going from 8 to 16 GB) vs. gratuitous (bumping all the way up to 64 GB? Same for storage. Better to keep everything on a share on the NAS, or have a local attached drive, and just backup to the NAS?

Thanks,

Monte
 

Evan

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Jan 6, 2016
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32gb ram is cheap, 64 is not really proportional more but it depends what you want to run, you wound be surprised what you can still run in. 32gb.

jusy a thought here or rather some perspective , HPE microsever gen10+ will handle a few drives (NAS duty) and add 16gb to get to 32gb is not a bad little server that whenyou price out multipurpose rPi’s and cases and so on doesn’t look badly priced and comparable to say a synology.

anyway back on topic the TMM or NUC options are way more flexible than the developer boards generally, take one and add a NVMe 1tb say for your VM’s and if your data is small a 3.84tb ssd and you can idle at 10-15w or in case of say NIC under 10 maybe. Make it a 4-core or better with 32gb and done, (just don’t forget backup)
 

memilanuk

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Jan 31, 2021
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Does the hardware (mobo) in TMM or NUC boxes generally support running Proxmox, with "IOMMU" aka PCI pass thru?
 

Evan

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Jan 6, 2016
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Intel NUC, yes. Can even pass through the iGPU.

Probably the others but best to try to find out before buying.
 

memilanuk

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Jan 31, 2021
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Kinda hard to do that buying used off eBay ;)

Took the plunge, and grabbed a Dell Optiplex 7060 i5-8500T; should be here next week... so fingers crossed!

Updating memory and SSD will be towards the end of the month after I get back from a trip.
 
Last edited:

kapone

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May 23, 2015
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When I read the title of this thread...I kept thinking that the OP was talking about SPEAKERS (You know..Tweeter/Mid/Mid configuration vs MTM etc) :D

I'd never in a million years have guessed that the OP was referring to small PCs...
 
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Evan

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Battery symbol means you can charge a device like phone when the machine is off but plugged in.
 

memilanuk

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Jan 31, 2021
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The 10 symbol indicate that port is USB 3.1 gen 2 which has 10Gbps speed.
Kinda assumed that was the case there. Good to have confirmation

Later was Smart Power ON keyboard.
So... do you think that is what the port with the "power on/off" symbol is? What does it do differently than the normal behavior of waking the device when you start poking the keyboard?

Battery symbol means you can charge a device like phone when the machine is off but plugged in.
Ah. Is it by chance a higher amp port than normal as well?
 

memilanuk

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Jan 31, 2021
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Okay... using the leads provided above (thanks @Evan and @Aluminat !) I think the terms I was looking for are 'USB PowerShare' (allows charging thru the port with the machine otherwise powered off) and 'USB Wake Support'.

Looks like I may have to poke around in the BIOS a bit and see if the latter is enabled or not (what I found online was unclear whether it's enabled by default or not).