storage gold rush?

Wasmachineman_NL

Dell Precisions FTW!
Aug 7, 2019
1,254
412
83
* blows off some dust and looks in the bits box *

Guys guys guys! I've got a GREAT deal for you here - enterprise class U160 SCSI drives that I'm prepared to let go for the low, low price of only £3.50/GB. Anyone purchasing eight or more drives gets a controller thrown in for free!!!

Rhodium level subscribers get first dibs on my U320 enterprise drives - twice as fast as the U160 and only £5/GB.
that's pleb shit

*breaks out his RAID 0 IBM Deskstar 75GXP/ABIT BP6 setup*

Only ƒ9000,-!
 

newabc

Active Member
Jan 20, 2019
270
107
43
Someone posted yesterday that the Xianyu(Taobao.com's 2nd-hand market) price for an 8T HDD is close to the brand-new one's MSRP already.
 

tinfoil3d

QSFP28
May 11, 2020
556
198
43
Japan
Hilarious, guys. Need to go check out my garage for those 3.5in seagate 80mb hdds from 90s. I think I saw 5.25 a long time ago too.
 

thetoad

Active Member
Feb 10, 2021
236
97
28
I have close to 400TB of online storage and probably a similiar if not greater amount in offline (mostly external drives, about 120 of them starting I. The 2tb range going up to 8tb to base don the sweet spot when I bought them) storage.

Also just bought 18 14tb sas drives for $220 each.
 
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tinfoil3d

QSFP28
May 11, 2020
556
198
43
Japan
I have close to 400TB of online storage and probably a similiar if not greater amount in offline (mostly external drives, about 120 of them starting I. The 2tb range going up to 8tb to base don the sweet spot when I bought them) storage.

Also just bought 18 14tb sas drives for $220 each.
For yourself I presume? As most of these hamsters don't know what SAS is and how to use it.
 

tinfoil3d

QSFP28
May 11, 2020
556
198
43
Japan
long ago. save your search results(index, archive, screenshot) and compare them every day. relax and have a drink watching hamsters getting a haircut.
 

lunadesign

Active Member
Aug 7, 2013
220
28
28
That's the biggest issue eh, with HDDs you can be relatively sure there isn't any data left, with SSDs you never know how the spare flash is addressed by the controller and what may end up where.
I though Secure Erase was supposed to hit spare flash too? Otherwise it doesn't seem very "Secure".
 

tinfoil3d

QSFP28
May 11, 2020
556
198
43
Japan
I though Secure Erase was supposed to hit spare flash too? Otherwise it doesn't seem very "Secure".
While I do use it, I won't trust it when letting go off the drive. Implementations of such features vary a lot and almost never there's a solid guarantee it works as it's suposed to. You're just blindly trusting someone to make it right.
 
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i386

Well-Known Member
Mar 18, 2016
3,225
1,032
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Germany
The lowest prices for new exos x16 (ST16000NM001G) went up 30%+ in the last week, most retailers are out of stock:
Cheapest price is still 30%+, I think they will update the price after this weekend, but other more known retailers have doubled the price (600+ €, was ~300€ no even two weeks ago) and have waiting times of two or more weeks...
 

thetoad

Active Member
Feb 10, 2021
236
97
28
For yourself I presume? As most of these hamsters don't know what SAS is and how to use it.
Yea. I just bought 3 12xLFF servers and was planning on filling them up. Wanted to buy 18 then another (to fill up 2 CC bonuses), looks like the 2nd 18 might be a problem now :(
 

thetoad

Active Member
Feb 10, 2021
236
97
28
While I do use it, I won't trust it when letting go off the drive. Implementations of such features vary a lot and almost never there's a solid guarantee it works as it's suposed to. You're just blindly trusting someone to make it right.
it should be easy to make "right".

every write is encrypted with a key stored in flash. every read is decrypted with said key. secure erase becomes simply changing the key (and marking all blocks free). Assuming the encryption is secure, on has effectively erased the disk, as one can't read anything.
 
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RTM

Well-Known Member
Jan 26, 2014
877
330
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it should be easy to make "right".

every write is encrypted with a key stored in flash. every read is decrypted with said key. secure erase becomes simply changing the key (and marking all blocks free). Assuming the encryption is secure, on has effectively erased the disk, as one can't read anything.
Unfortunately the reality is that drive vendors have consistently failed at implementing crypto.

Microsoft even changed the default setting for Bitlocker to not use disk's built-in crypto: Windows 10’s BitLocker Encryption No Longer Trusts Your SSD
 

tinfoil3d

QSFP28
May 11, 2020
556
198
43
Japan
right, there's no point in telling this to me. tell your ssd manufacturer. or read the papers if you don't believe, there's lot of them if you google. nobody cares about encryption. i'd say in fact, the chance is devices are deliberately designed flawed so that it'd be easy for a "right person" to access the data.
 

BackupProphet

Well-Known Member
Jul 2, 2014
846
323
63
Stavanger, Norway
kingmakers.no
Plotting Chia is perfect for SAS 2.5 10k spinners, I can create 50 plots/day on a 24 bay server with cheap 10k 2.5 SAS spinners
They consume some power though, but the heat from my basement decrease my regular power bill as it is so cold here in Norway :p

But will this shit be profitable, most likely not and I expect it to crash below 10 USD per Chia
 

tinfoil3d

QSFP28
May 11, 2020
556
198
43
Japan
But will this shit be profitable, most likely not and I expect it to crash below 10 USD per Chia
What size of drives are miners hunting for usually? I know a shop in Japan which is apparently unaffected by all this mess. Amazon seems to be sold out with individual sellers asking double-triple the normal price for em but in other places there's still cheap stock. 10tb ironwolf for around 280 usd and 10tb toshiba for around 235 usd. 16 and 18tb aren't that popular it seems as they're still sold on ebay for not that a high prices.
 

alex_stief

Well-Known Member
May 31, 2016
816
275
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My guess would have been that they search for the largest possible hard drives, to reduce both hardware overhead costs and power consumption.
Maybe SMR also plays a role in that? Hard to fill an 18TB drive in one go when write speeds drop below 10MB/s.