Normal/Safe SAS drive temps?

Sleyk

Well-Known Member
Mar 25, 2016
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Stamford, CT
So in celebration of my 700th post, I am ditching most of my SATA's for SAS drives :cool:


(Lol! Complete with the green dot blink so you know I wuz online :D)

eBay has excellent deals if you search around. Also SAS drives have great advantages over SATA:

1. They are more durable/less susceptible to heat/cold/electrical changes (I had a power supply failure once, and I had a box with mixed Enterprise SAS drives and SATA, and I lost all my SATA drives, but not ONE of my SAS drives failed.)
2. Compatibility with SAS controllers/adapters out the box (you do need SAS/SFF 8482 cables though) which leads to a more stable, faster connection, since the drives were designed to be used by these controllers, unlike SATA.
3. Cheap prices compared to SATA (Used, NOT NEW of course)

I bought a bunch of them and running now in my server. Everything looks good. They are Seagate Enterprise 4TB SAS drives.

The reason I posted this was because I was looking for some specific info on SAS drive temps and what margins/ranges are safe. I have been googling, but all I get are the reports from google around 2007 when they did the study on hard drives and found that 50C is ok for a hard drive, and the range of 25-50C is ideal.

Nothing specific to Enterprise SAS drives though as far as Ive seen. I have looked at my drive spec sheet and Seagate says between 5C-60C which is certainly excellent for a much older 4TB SAS drive. (Most newer drives with Helium nowadays also operate around 60C.)

So I am currently running around the 40C-47C range on my drives, so Im not worried, but for informational purposes only:

What do you guys think? What is an acceptable limit for SAS drive temps?
 
Last edited:

Fritz

Well-Known Member
Apr 6, 2015
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I think the higher the temp the shorter the life. HD Sentinel says caution above 43c and in the red above 50c by default. As usual, YMMV.
 

BLinux

cat lover server enthusiast
Jul 7, 2016
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artofserver.com
I do believe SAS drives are generally more reliable, however, it isn't simple to compare them to SATA, as in the SATA HDD space, there are a wide variety of grades of products. Some of the lowest end SATA products are even missing bearings on one side of the spindle and instead depend on the even pressure of the cover plate; that's how bad it gets when HDD companies start cutting corners to reduce production costs. But, there are Enterprise grade SATA too, and I generally think those are comparable to enterprise SAS, and then there's "Nearline SATA" as well... and NAS/red, purple, gold, etc., etc.....

like, I don't fully get the TLER and RAID edition/NAS HDDs vs non-RAID/NAS edition HDDs... before such products were around, I managed many, many servers with disk arrays using good old SCSI drives with both HW RAID and software RAID... so did HDD manufacturers remove a "feature" and then added it back as a higher end product?
 
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BeTeP

Well-Known Member
Mar 23, 2019
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My understanding is that for hard drives constant 45C is better than fluctuating 25-30C.

I think the higher the temp the shorter the life.
This becomes true at much higher temperatures.

There is just a single thing in my server room I would definitely want to keep below 30C and it's UPS batteries. I would not worry about anything else.
 

EffrafaxOfWug

Radioactive Member
Feb 12, 2015
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For what it's worth, in my experience SAS drives and SATA drives both have about the same reliability rate. Sure, there are good manufacturers and bad manufacturers, good designs and bad designs, good batches and bad batches, but coming from someone who's managed a fair bunch of kit comprising of both expensive and cheap drives there's no appreciable difference to me (and yes, I collect stats on failure rates). The only advantage of using SAS IMHO is greater speed and access to more enterprisey features.

like, I don't fully get the TLER and RAID edition/NAS HDDs vs non-RAID/NAS edition HDDs... before such products were around, I managed many, many servers with disk arrays using good old SCSI drives with both HW RAID and software RAID... so did HDD manufacturers remove a "feature" and then added it back as a higher end product?
In a nutshell, yes. SCSI and ATA were very different feature sets (and substantially different hardware) originally, but when SAS came along HDD designers converged their designs for the two for the case of simplicity. Firmware design, being one of the more expensive parts of the development process, was likewise homogenised whilst so that SATA drives got access to a lot of the features that SCSI/SAS was used to. Once that was done however, manufacturers started to segment the product lines once again, so things like TLER vanished from the consumer lines.
 

BeTeP

Well-Known Member
Mar 23, 2019
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@EffrafaxOfWug

Cool story, bro. Too bad it is very far from what was actually happening in the industry - all described events, their timelines and reasons are way off. All but the last bit about TLER being removed from some products for the market segmentation purposes. But that part was already kind of obvious even to the person who asked the question. So a simple "yes" would have sufficed.