Need some more Linux/NextCloud help :(

Fritz

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Apr 6, 2015
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I'm installing NextCloud on Ubuntu-MATE using the instructions found here -
How to Install the Nextcloud Server on Ubuntu

I'm running into a bunch of problems starting with saving the nextcloud.conf file. I follow the directions and don't get an error message but when I look in the etc/Apache2/sites-available, it's not there.

Right now I get "apache2.service is not active, cannot reload." When I try to start the apache2 service. So now I'm stuck.

I do have a couple of fundamental questions.

1. When instructed to create and save a file, only once does it say WHERE to save the file and that's the nextcloud.conf file. The 2 scripts you create, it don't say where to save them or where to run them from. I suspect this may be the cause of my problems.
2. Are path references not needed in Linux? I see commands all the time that don't mention location at all. So how does the OS know where the objects in question are. (Not sure if "Objects" is the right word or now. Maybe files and folders would be more appropriate)
 

T_Minus

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If you can't reload it then 'start' it.

If that doesn't work then stop it, then start it.

If that still doesn't work what's the output of apache status?

The only other file I see quickly scanning looks to be the permissions script that just runs through making changes to specified, static locations so that script location is irrelevant.
 

Fritz

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can you tell me how to output apache status? I googled it but got "No Such File or Directory" which is pretty much what I always get with googled help. There must be some secret formula that only the Illuminati know.
 

T_Minus

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The structure of the command is the same it just varies based on version and distro AFAIK.
Universally "service (the service) status" will report status of specified service... ie: httpd, mysqld, etc...

You can try:

service apache2 status
service httpd status
/etc/init.d/httpd status

The first I believe should work for you.
 

Fritz

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Thank you sir. I had to do a screen shot because C&P doesn't work between Linux and Windows.
apachestatus.jpg
 

NashBrydges

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The instructions you're working from are very old. Nextcloud has just released its Nextcloud 12 Beta with 11.03 as the current stable release.

Can I ask...why are you installing on a desktop? Do you have a virtual environment? If you do, and you're willing to try a different distro, I used these instructions and worked very well.

Fedora:
Install Nextcloud 11.03 on Fedora 25 Minimal

CentSO:
Install NextCloud 11.0.2 on CentOS 7 with PHP 7.1 from Remi

If you really want to stick to Ubuntu, I've followed this tutorial before and it worked.
Set up NextCloud Server on Ubuntu 16.04 with Apache, MariaDB and PHP7 - LinuxBabe.Com
 
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T_Minus

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@Fritz I'm not sure what you're asking with the screen shot it's telling you there's a problem with your config, the line of the problem, and the error log has more info... read that stuff and go from there.
 

Fritz

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Thanks. Is there a way to remove Apache2 completely and start from scratch? I'll also look at Fedora and CentOS. NextCloud is all it will be running so that may be the way I go..... If I can get it running. :)

Also, I might ask, which is better Fedora or CentOS?
 

T_Minus

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I don't have an opinion I've only played with Fedora while have used RH and CentOS for, well.. since before RHEL.

The Difference Between Fedora, Redhat, and CentOS

Looks like what I've heard, and thus CentOS makes the most sense unless you're after latest/cutting edge, which is where I have a few Ubuntu in use... so far they seem to be on the most cutting edge! I haven't looked at Fedora vs. Ubuntu recently (so if you do please let me know) for cutting edge but Ubuntu has worked with the just released storage or had drivers before RHEL/CentOS was working for me.
 
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Fritz

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Thank you sir. I will be changing directions tomorrow. The reason I went with Ubuntu-MATE is I've just loaded it on my main PC and was blown away. So far it truly is a Windows killer. I've gotten everything I need to work and am finding thing daily I like better than Windows. The only CLI tasks I've had to tackle have been printer drivers but even that was relatively painless. And one of the printers was a Canon. Libreoffice is impressive. It opens MS Office files, including Excel spreadsheets flawlessly and has all the features I need. Virtualbox and Remmina are very capable replacements for HyperV and RDC. Thunderbird is so close to Outlook that I don't miss it a bit. I did load Windows in Virtualbox but only used it once to run Advanced IP Scanner but then discovered ARPScan and haven't run it since. Plus, it feels good to know that MS isn't spying on me.
 

Fritz

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CRAP, never mind. It seems the Internet is chock full of bogus info. Most of it is either obsolete or half complete. It's like navigating a minefield. :(
 
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Fritz

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I give up on CentOS. I spent hours trying to get it to work and ran into all kinds of problems. After dealing with all of them , successfully I thought, I ended up with a Forbidden 403 error when trying to access it via a browser. I rebooted and now I don't even get that. It's back to Ubuntu where at least I'm not totally blind.
 

T_Minus

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It sounds like you may need to slow down and go beyond copying/pasting the commands and learn what the commands actually do/affect in your system. I know it's easy and fast to copy/paste commands but if you're not aware of what's being affected you won't have any idea how to troubleshoot, or where to go next when things do not work. Break down what you did step by step, figure out what was affected and go in reverse order to find the problem.

Since you're dealing with configuration files, and it sounds like configuring services and more possibly too you're going to have the potential of making things broken by a simple misplaced character, not auto starting services that other software depends on, etc...

If you got a 403 and reboot you get nothing is your web server running?
 

Fritz

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You are correct. I have yet to see a set of instructions that explains what the syntax means and what the commands actually do. There also seems to be a mountain of obsolete info out there that one would have to sort through to get to the up to date info. Web sites tend to leave old info that's no longer relevant and I have wasted more time than I care to admit following this bogus date. Right now I'm going to chill for a bit before tackling it again. I almost deleted the CentOS VM but then decided not to in case I change my mind. I'm all for learning but all there seems to be out there are step by step instructions which teach nothing.
 

Kybber

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Make sure you do not follow instructions for older/other versions of your distribution of choice. For instance, if your VM is CentOS 7, be very wary about following instructions for CentOS 6. Following instructions for other minor releases within the same major release will most often work nicely (for instance instructions for CentOS 6.4 when your VM is CentOS 6.7).
 

Kybber

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Also, if you /really/ want to learn Linux, try to install Gentoo Linux in a VM. The installation documentation is ridiculously detailed, and you will learn a lot even before you have an up and running system. I don't recommend Gentoo for production, but it's a great distro for learning Linux.