Is anyone familiar with HP DL360 / 380 G5, G6, G7 series?

Discussion in 'FreeBSD and FreeNAS' started by DrStein99, Mar 20, 2018.

  1. DrStein99

    DrStein99 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2018
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    4
    I want to buy a used older model HP DL rack server, but I am confused. I would like a large array of hot-swap 2.5" SATA interface trays, and 2 power supplies. I am building my 2nd freeNas server, and the one I have now has out-grown it's hardware.

    Does anyone here know the variation differences on these HP GEN-5/6/7/8 series rack servers? What confuses me (unless I am reading things wrong) is that the same HP dl 380 G6 appears to run the same series XEON processors as G7, using the same PC3 registered ram. I am having trouble choosing a model. I was hoping someone here could have some insight with their experience, please?
     
    #1
  2. ecosse

    ecosse Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2013
    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    36
    G6->G7 - Higher memory support. Higher core CPU support. Better power management. Better ILO. Better PCI-E expansion (all in theory from reading quick blurb). Things like that.
    If the NAS is going to be on 24x7 I'd look for the best power efficiencies using low powered CPU's (60W). Gen8 would be preferred, that generation supports PCIE3
     
    #2
  3. Evan

    Evan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2016
    Messages:
    2,087
    Likes Received:
    289
    Gen8 also supported more drives in form of a 25SFF but it’s actually not upgradable from the base 8SFF model like the gen9 is.
    Gen8 with e5 v1/v2 uses considerably less power compared to gen6/gen7 systems.

    I guess the difference is you can probably get a gen7 for so close to free just take it away from me vs having to pay some money for Gen8
     
    #3
  4. DrStein99

    DrStein99 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2018
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    4
    For what I need out of it now - a G8 is double the cost of a G7. I probably do not even need 2 processors, since it's just about going to be on idle mostly the entire time. I want 8 bays, it looks like the DL380 is it. The G6 and G7 are closely priced and I am not planning to install more than 32GB of ram, for this unit.
     
    #4
  5. EffrafaxOfWug

    EffrafaxOfWug Radioactive Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2015
    Messages:
    577
    Likes Received:
    185
    <obligatory "why do you want an HP?" post incoming>

    If you only want a server for it having eight hot-swap bays, IMHO there are a dozen better options than buying an HP system* - especially if you already think you're unlikely to need a 2P system. If noise is a concern at all you'll want to stay away from most rackmount kit until you've done very heavy research on making sure the the bastards will be quiet (although if you BYO it's entirely possible to make 3U or 4U systems run very quietly indeed; 2U is harder but still achievable).

    * (Disclaimer: I work in an HP shop and even with a fully paid up "how much?!" support contract their idiotic firmware and driver support practices combined with incompetent account management and mediocre support have sworn me off them forever)
     
    #5
  6. DrStein99

    DrStein99 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2018
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    4
    The HP DL parts are really easy to find to repair or upgrade. It will fit nicely on my rack of many other DELL servers (once I manage to get the rack rails for the lunch money prices I am only willing to pay). Rack chassis are easy for me to get into, maintain, put back together - turn back on and be done. I would buy another DELL server, except I compared the prices to HP for used equipment and HP is less expensive, it seems due to their excessive numbers. In the past, I have found HP equipment is far more advanced than Dell, but I used Dell because it's less expensive.

    I do not care about server fan noise does not bother me at all. I find it odd that you would spend alot of time and / or money just to reduce the noise of cooling fans. I actually have to wear ear-plugs to drown out the awful ambient noise of other people babbling nonsense in the background.

    What other system besides rack mount would be more ideal and cost effective?
     
    #6
  7. Evan

    Evan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2016
    Messages:
    2,087
    Likes Received:
    289
    Yes HP is robust, there will be lots more G7 parts around though. As I said advantage of that vintage is very low cost.
     
    #7
  8. DrStein99

    DrStein99 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2018
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    4
    There is also IBM, Super-micro, and I think Intel makes servers too - but I am not familiar with that hardware. It took me a few days to understand what I know about HP DL servers, and it would take at least that much time for me to study anything else. I know for certain, between Dell and HP - there are plenty of them for sale, and I won't run out of places to look for cheap parts that are practically never used. A lot of times big businesses just buy extra back-up servers that are not even unwrapped - and go back to the leasing company unused, and then sold to me for lunch money! Wowee, it would be nice if I owned a business that could afford to do that....
     
    #8
  9. DrStein99

    DrStein99 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2018
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    4
    Ok, I think I discovered what you could have been talking about - maybe. There are SAS array SAN appliances, "NETAPP" makes alot of them. Looks like a housing with 14 or 24+ backplane for 2.5" hot-swap SAS drives with double hot-swap power supplies and double redundant controllers (which look like blade CPU servers). This way I could have a larger array for playing with even more hard drives.

    Or they have the SAS array shelf, with 40-gigabit connectors that I can wire up to an existing server with a 40gb PCI card in it, to attach the array to that, instead of combining the big array and the server into one large electric burning heat-fan itself.

    The world is not without options, I tell you. I was thinking I could use ISCSI initator to attach a FreeNas box to a SAS array, but that SAS array actually has to have the whole CPU/motherboard thing on it already to manage the RAID, cache, i/o etc - so, that would defeat the purpose of an external FreeNas appliance, if I had to have another machine to manage the data that was managed by the first machine. In the case of the NetAPP boxes, they all have dual-redundant controllers for either load balancing or backup purposes and each of those controllers are actually a whole computer system each itself with its own ram CPU's and pci bus.

    What I picked out was this hp dl360 GEN 7, it has 8 SAS drive bays, (1) Xeon 5660, and PC3 ram. This should get me started and running for hopefully a year or two before I outgrow that again, then figure out how I would continue to insure the safety of many terabytes of data, since it isn't like I can just grab another hard drive off the shelf and back that stuff up to that while I make another new SAN/NAS storage server.
     
    #9
  10. weust

    weust Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2014
    Messages:
    211
    Likes Received:
    18
    Also keep in mind that if you want to download drives/firmwares/etc for your server, you will need a support contract with HP.
    If you don't have it, you're not downloading anything.
     
    #10
Similar Threads: anyone familiar
Forum Title Date
FreeBSD and FreeNAS FreeNAS 11.1 super buggy for anyone else? Jan 18, 2018
FreeBSD and FreeNAS Anyone ever see a boot SATA SSD disappear? Nov 21, 2017
FreeBSD and FreeNAS Anyone have experience with Opnsense? Oct 14, 2017

Share This Page