Dual XEON 2696 v4 Workstation Build Log & Benchmarks

Nanotech

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the truth is pretty simple here - a typical threadripper setup gives you half of the performance (cb ~3000) for the same price of a dual 2696v4.
Each 2696 V4 on eBay is about $1169 used. That's 2338 for both processors not including motherboard and the rest of the components. So it's not the same price of a dual 2696 V4 considering that the 1950X is $999 at Microcenter and a dual 2696 V4 processor's cost $2338 for a pair or $1169 individually. So when you take into account motherboard and memory for a Threadripper setup it ends up being cheaper than a 2696 V4 dual-socket setup while offering better price/performance. Besides your comparing a single socket setup to a dual socket setup. That's not an accurate nor proper comparison.
 
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wildpig1234

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2696 v4 is not good example.. dual 2686/96 v3 is better example of significantly better performance than 1950x for about same price or slightly more expensive. ..

Dual 2696 v2 is actually best bargain. .. nearly same performance on many benchmark with much cheaper cpu and ram price
 

lni

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Dual 2696 v2 is actually best bargain. .. nearly same performance on many benchmark with much cheaper cpu and ram price
the problem is all those $300 2696v2 are gone, sellers on ebay are asking for $500-600 for a 2696v2.
 

lni

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Each 2696 V4 on eBay is about $1169 used. That's 2338 for both processors not including motherboard and the rest of the components. So it's not the same price of a dual 2696 V4 considering that the 1950X is $999 at Microcenter and a dual 2696 V4 processor's cost $2338 for a pair or $1169 individually. So when you take into account motherboard and memory for a Threadripper setup it ends up being cheaper than a 2696 V4 dual-socket setup while offering better price/performance. Besides your comparing a single socket setup to a dual socket setup. That's not an accurate nor proper comparison.
I bought a pair of 2696v4 for $2k shipped, for a single 2696v4 build (which I tried for a few days before the arrival of the second cpu), the total cost would be -
$1k for 2696v4
$300 for dual socket mb
$1.5k for 16Gx8 2133p ECC REG SAMSUNG RAM
that is $2.8k for CPU+MB+RAM

for threadripper, you'd pay
$1k for processor
$400 for a x399 mb
$1.5k for 16Gx8 2400 RAM
the total is nothing really different, $2.8k or $2.9k in total.

you get similar Cinebench score for such two builds, around 3200 (assuming the 2400 RAM doesn't completely screw threadripper's performance).

different from the threadripper, which is pretty much a dead end, you can add another 2696v4 any time when you need more cpu cores, you can also install more RAM as there are 16 DIMM slots not just 8.
 
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Nanotech

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I bought a pair of 2696v4 for $2k shipped, for a single 2696v4 build (which I tried for a few days before the arrival of the second cpu), the total cost would be -
$1k for 2696v4
$300 for dual socket mb
$1.5k for 16Gx8 2133p ECC REG SAMSUNG RAM
that is $2.8k for CPU+MB+RAM

for threadripper, you'd pay
$1k for processor
$400 for a x399 mb
$1.5k for 16Gx8 2400 RAM
the total is nothing really different, $2.8k or $2.9k in total.
That price comparison is incorrect and it makes the Threadripper seem more expense than it should be. If we take your breakdown for Threadripper and modify it with the following:

1. AsRock Taichi X399 ($60 saving)
2. 64Gb or 32Gb of DDR4-2400 that's at least many hundreds of dollars in savings if not more (for example a 32Gb kit will be around $200 which means over $1300 in savings over your memory price quote). For Threadripper 128Gb of DDR4-2400 memory is not needed and you will find most enthusiast builds at 32GB or 64GB. Even if you applied less memory for the V4 Xeon the processors still alone cost more than the 1950X processor. Moving down to a 1920X the cost savings become even more so. At this point the 2696 V4 isn't worth the asking price it commands on the used market just like the other overpriced V3/V4 Xeons. Their price will drop and Threadripper is already putting pressure on the used Xeon market and on HEDT in general from Intel.

you get similar Cinebench score for such two builds, around 3200 (assuming the 2400 RAM doesn't completely screw threadripper's performance).

different from the threadripper, which is pretty much a dead end, you can add another 2696v4 any time when you need more cpu cores, you can also install more RAM as there are 16 DIMM slots not just 8.
How is X399 a dead-end socket or platform when it will likely support Threadripper's Ryzen 2 derivatives and perhaps EPYC-W derivatives or variants? It's still quad-channel and most consumers or enthusiasts do not use 128Gb. Few are using 64Gb and more commonly seen is 16Gb or 32Gb. Just because a motherboard has 8 or 16 DIMM slots doesn't mean it should be maxed out.

I don't think your comparison is accurate nor an apples to apples comparison. We're comparing dual socket systems to a single socket HEDT. If you want to compare then you can use Intel's X299 16 or 18 core i9 and compare it with Threadripper. Threadripper will still beat it in price/performance. Not to mention the V3/V4 Xeons are locked (aside from the E5-16XX versions) while Threadripper is unlocked and can be overclocked for a free performance boost. That's another reason why the dual socket vs single socket HEDT X399 comparison is difficult if not accurate to compare properly.
 
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wildpig1234

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the problem is all those $300 2696v2 are gone, sellers on ebay are asking for $500-600 for a 2696v2.
wow that was fast..... proving again that 2nd hand xeon price are totally supply side dependent....
 

lni

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wow that was fast..... proving again that 2nd hand xeon price are totally supply side dependent....
2696v3 was a pretty cool overclocking capable chip, but once the overclocking hack was proved to be stable & efficient, all sellers lifted the price to 80% of a 2696v4 rendering v3 totally meaningless.

market economy :)
 

lni

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That price comparison is incorrect and it makes the Threadripper seem more expense than it should be. If we take your breakdown for Threadripper and modify it with the following:
using your logic, I can further argue that it is just $1.4k for a 2696v4 based system as I can install 4G of RAM, surely there are some applications requiring no more than amount.

there might be future threadripper releases, however, there is no way they can release a single socket processor capable of delivering 5500 CINEBENCH score. as long as the price is close, I don't care whether its is 1p or 2p, I care about performance, which is not currently available from any threadripper product.
 

Nanotech

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using your logic, I can further argue that it is just $1.4k for a 2696v4 based system as I can install 4G of RAM, surely there are some applications requiring no more than amount.
You were previously arguing for 128GB of memory and comparing a 2P dual socket system to a 1P X399 Threadripper HEDT system. Now you are using a 1P processor Xeon with a higher core count and a locked multiplier and saying that 4GB is sufficient. X399 and a X99 Xeon are completely different platforms and different processors.

there might be future threadripper releases, however, there is no way they can release a single socket processor capable of delivering 5500 CINEBENCH score. as long as the price is close, I don't care whether its is 1p or 2p, I care about performance, which is not currently available from any threadripper product.
Your only judging performance based of a synthetic benchmark and trying to compare a 2P to 1P platform. That's not a proper nor accurate comparison. I understand that you own the 2696 V4 2P system but a proper and accurate comparison would be a 16c X299 i9 processor which is unlocked against the X399 1950X processor (ie 1P Intel vs 1P AMD platform on overclockable processors with same core count). Comparing a 22c/44t locked processor on a 2P platform to a unlocked 1P X399 16c/32t processor is not a proper comparison for multiple reasons listed above and previously. At this point I won't be discussing this further as we aren't reaching an agreement on this and we both have different views.
 
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wildpig1234

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2P or 1P, the bottom line is total processing power for multithread for the dollar. (as well as other things like MB price and ram). MB price is fairly similar for both 2011 2P MB as well as DDr4 ram. right now you can still build a system with 2nd hand xeon cpu that will beat 1950x for about the same price and a little higher power usage. add on the fact that TR support for ECC ram is still not completely baked as well as the 128GB ram limit, 2011 v3 and v4 2nd hand cpu is still a very viable solution

the 2696v4 is a poor comparison because that particular cpu is still too expensive. if you compare dual 2686/96 v3 to 1950x then it's hard to argue that 1950x is really better since the price of dual 2686/96 v3 is no more than $100 more than that of 1950x but with much better multithread performance. who care if it's dual cpu with 36 cores total vs 16 cores total.... it's the price to performance at the end of the day that counts. of course xeon ability to have more than 128GB is a bonus.

let's not also forget the little guy 2696v2. Same performance as 1950x on many benchmark or possibly slightly slower on a few but for much cheaper price for two cpu and much cheaper ram.
 

lni

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You were previously arguing for 128GB of memory and comparing a 2P dual socket system to a 1P X399 Threadripper HEDT system. Now you are using a 1P processor Xeon with a higher core count and a locked multiplier and saying that 4GB is sufficient. X399 and a X99 Xeon are completely different platforms and different processors.
no one cares whether there are 1 or 2 sockets on the mb sitting inside the case, it is all about two simple questions: how much I paid and what performance I am getting.

let's say both builds (threadripper 1950x and single 2696v4 on dual socket c612 mb such as X10DAI) use 4x8G RAM, then the cost and cinebench scores are pretty much the same - $1.5k for cpu/mb/ram and you get 3000-3200 cinebench score. as already explained, x399+threadripper is pretty much a dead end, you don't have any immediate upgrade option, for 2696v4, you can just buy the second processor and almost double (~5300 CB score) your multiple thread performance. ECC support, more RAM slots are the bonus.
 

wildpig1234

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no one cares whether there are 1 or 2 sockets on the mb sitting inside the case, it is all about two simple questions: how much I paid and what performance I am getting.

let's say both builds (threadripper 1950x and single 2696v4 on dual socket c612 mb such as X10DAI) use 4x8G RAM, then the cost and cinebench scores are pretty much the same - $1.5k for cpu/mb/ram and you get 3000-3200 cinebench score. as already explained, x399+threadripper is pretty much a dead end, you don't have any immediate upgrade option, for 2696v4, you can just buy the second processor and almost double (~5300 CB score) your multiple thread performance. ECC support, more RAM slots are the bonus.
Completely agree. I think 2696 v4 is slightly more expensive that 1950x but you also do get slightly better performance. At the end of the day it is all about performance/$

If you want flexibility and have the money build a single 2696v4. you won't save any money over 1950x for the same performance but you get the ability to increase your performance later with the ability to add another cpu.

If you are on a very tight budget, build a dual 2696 v2 and get almost about the same performance as 1950x for much much cheaper (including ram).... but you also have no cpu upgrade path

If you have slightly more budget, build a dual 2686/96 v3 for same price as 1950x with significantly better performance right away. at later date, you still have the option to spring for 2696v4 if you want.

No one is denying that TR is killing intel, but for 2nd hand cpu market, 2011 is still very competitive!

If amd decides to really come down on their epyc parts price, then we might have something else to look at
 
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riven

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I´ve just bought Asus Z10PE-D16 WS modo, but after reading some forums, there is lot of problems, espacially with E5-2696V4 cpus,
So I think about getting Supermicro X10-DAX mobo, server/workstation board, maybe less problems.

Cpus 2x E5-2696V4. Memory 4x16GB DDR4 ECC REG 2400 CL17/or 2133/CL15?/
booting Samsung 960PRO 512GB, 850PRO 512GB Work, 2x3TB HDD RAID 1 BACKUP, 1x4TB HDD.
Quadro K5000, Corsair HX1200i PSU
 
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Kneelbeforezod

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V4s support 2400 so go for 2400 definitely. I'm using 2400 with V3s and it downclocks to 2133. That way i can move to V4s when prices come down.

I'm using the X10DAX - see my thread

Also check out the Open Box thread I posted in the Deals Section - Open box items at Newegg are a great way to save cash and you might find a board you like.
 

moblaw

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Jun 23, 2017
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I´ve just bought Asus Z10PE-D16 WS modo, but after reading some forums, there is lot of problems, espacially with E5-2696V4 cpus,
So I think about getting Supermicro X10-DAX mobo, server/workstation board, maybe less problems.

Cpus 2x E5-2696V4. Memory 4x16GB DDR4 ECC REG 2400 CL17/or 2133/CL15?/
booting Samsung 960PRO 512GB, 850PRO 512GB Work, 2x3TB HDD RAID 1 BACKUP, 1x4TB HDD.
Quadro K5000, Corsair HX1200i PSU

I had a Z10PE D16WS produced in 2014, so I bought a "new" Z10PED16WS, since my 2014 board did not boot with 2696 V4. New board is from 2017. I too wanted X10DAX or DAI, but those boards does not feature dedicated IPMI, which is a fail imo. You can use cmd and run command "wmic baseboard get product,Manufacturer,version,serialnumber" this will tell you, when your board is produced. Some1 already mentioned in this forum, that it has to be Nov. 2015. to support V4s. I have no regrets, only a second Z10PED16WS on hand.. What a nice feature from Asus...

CPU-Z Bench, indicated that dual 2696v4 is 12% faster than single tr 1950x
 

riven

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Oct 25, 2016
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I had a Z10PE D16WS produced in 2014, so I bought a "new" Z10PED16WS, since my 2014 board did not boot with 2696 V4. New board is from 2017. I too wanted X10DAX or DAI, but those boards does not feature dedicated IPMI, which is a fail imo. You can use cmd and run command "wmic baseboard get product,Manufacturer,version,serialnumber" this will tell you, when your board is produced. Some1 already mentioned in this forum, that it has to be Nov. 2015. to support V4s. I have no regrets, only a second Z10PED16WS on hand.. What a nice feature from Asus...

CPU-Z Bench, indicated that dual 2696v4 is 12% faster than single tr 1950x
Can I recognise production date from paper box? Is this information on some sticker?
 

moblaw

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Jun 23, 2017
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Can I recognise production date from paper box? Is this information on some sticker?
No and no. I called Asus support, and they were only able to see when the warrenty was valid from and to by the serial/no, and it help up pretty exact to the production date. Either that, or they want you to mail support or fill out some sort of request, It's anything but customer friendly.