Dell C6220 2U Server too good?

YetAnotherMinion

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Mar 22, 2016
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Natex is offering Dell C6220 2U Server w/3 Dell 0TTH1R nodes

Dell C6220 2U Server w/3 Dell 0TTH1R nodes
at $2.2k which seems really low for what the description seems to me to be including.

This Dell C6220 server features:

-3 x Dell 0TTH1R Nodes
-6 x Intel Xeon E5-2650 2.00 Ghz. 20MB 8-Core SR0KQ
-(48x8GB) 348GB Hynix PC3L-10600R RAM
-3 x Dell X53DF TCK99 Dual port 10 Gigabit SFP+ Converged Network Adapter
-12 x 3.5" HDD Bays (HDDs and trays not included)
-1 x Dell Hot Swap 1400W Power Supply

Can anyone speak to the reliability of Natex? I am strongly considering purchasing one or two of these as the price looks close enough to the open compute windmill builds, but with the advantage of having a newer socker (by claiming to support Xenon E5-26XX v4 I am assuming it is an LGA2011-v3) and higher max RAM.
 

Patrick

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Just for reference, that is more than I paid for my four node C6220's with faster processors, hard drive trays, redundant PSUs and etc. I also got a 2 year support contract with mine.
 
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Aestr

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I think he's referring to what I assume is a typo in the tech specs. I agree it almost certainly doesn't have V3/4 support. The system as sold even comes with V1 Xeons and DDR3.
 

YetAnotherMinion

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Mar 22, 2016
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@Patrick Where did you find yours if I may ask? I just got into the build your own hardware and have been using the performance per price of the open compute windmills (LGA2011-v1 2670 + DDR3) as a reference point.

The difference in socket on the c6220 is huge to me though, without a more modern processor then it is way overpriced compared with windmill ($1400 for same performance)

EDIT: I really want something that fits in a regular rack. I want to colo, and I do not want to be stacking those
open compute nodes sideways with some sketchy homemade bracket.
 

YetAnotherMinion

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Mar 22, 2016
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Thank you Patrick for the tips. I already have cast my die with 208V-277V power by going with the windmill systems, so now its just a matter of finding the right balance of cheap hardware and size to take advantage of E5 sale.
 

gotchu

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Can I ask a stupid question? Can I use C6220 on a standard 110v power system? I saw several of you mentioned 208v-2xx volts.
 

Patrick

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Can I ask a stupid question? Can I use C6220 on a standard 110v power system? I saw several of you mentioned 208v-2xx volts.
Somewhat. The standard PSUs require 200V+ I believe so you might need to get new PSUs. The other aspect is that if you are using 110V you are likely on a 15A breaker. As a general rule you want to plan for no more than 80% of your breaker load so that is 12A. 12A * 110V = 1320W. You will also have some power loss so say you are running at 95% efficiency in the PSUs which means you have around 1254W for the chassis.

On four node units, that is only a bit over 300W per which is much less than a dual CPU system can draw. If you run single CPUs/ machine you are *probably* going to be OK.

The reason these are designed for higher Volt input power is that they consume a lot of power when fully loaded.
 
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gotchu

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Somewhat. The standard PSUs require 200V+ I believe so you might need to get new PSUs. The other aspect is that if you are using 110V you are likely on a 15A breaker. As a general rule you want to plan for no more than 80% of your breaker load so that is 12A. 12A * 110V = 1320W. You will also have some power loss so say you are running at 95% efficiency in the PSUs which means you have around 1254W for the chassis.

On four node units, that is only a bit over 300W per which is much less than a dual CPU system can draw. If you run single CPUs/ machine you are *probably* going to be OK.

The reason these are designed for higher Volt input power is that they consume a lot of power when fully loaded.
Thank you so much, Patrick. The math is simple enough to understand~ I'll contact the facility manager in my school to see what's the max watt I can use.